Tag: Wrexham

Skeletons In The Closet & Brinkmanship At Wrexham

At least, some may choose to reflect, the team is still winning. Wrexham went to Grimsby Town yesterday and came returned with a comfortable 3-1, which left them at the top of the Blue Square Premier on goal difference from second placed Gateshead with a quarter of the season now played. This result was, however, little comfort at the end of another week which has seen tumult behind the scenes at the club and the departure of a manager who was starting to come of age in his position. As these things always seem to pan out with Wrexham, it was a week that left a sour taste in the mouth and more questions than answers at The Racecourse Ground. That Dean Saunders should have left Wrexham for Doncaster Rovers is, perhaps, no great surprise. Even if we are to set the problems that the club has been through of late to one side for a moment, a job offer from the Championship whilst managing a club in the Blue Square Premier is always likely to cause a manager to think twice about where his future might lay. Some have sought to spin the departure of Saunders as being a reaction to the email leaked several weeks ago which seemed to indicate a possibility of a degree of fractiousness between the Wrexham Supporters Trust board and the manager, but...

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Supporters’ Trusts: Some Hard Questions

This weekend the saga of Trust ownership at Wrexham extends. Plymouth Argyle struggle to find an ownership solution to coming out of administration. In the tales of duplicity and ineptness that abound behind these stories, the arguments in favour of the Supporters Trust movement are strengthened. Supporters’ Direct have made clear and cogent points that substantiate these arguments in their recent briefing papers. Yet are Supporters’ Trusts always best placed to take over at their clubs? The current state of financial governance in football does not make for an even playing field for supporter owned clubs. It takes tough customers to have the tenacity to stick with the principles of the Supporter Owned Model when the financial structure of the game allows your business opponents a head start in the competition, despite the fact that they often put the very existence of their ‘business’ at risk, as Supporters’ Direct’s analysis shows. The recent government enquiry into football governance opened its evaluation of supporter ownership with the bald statement, ‘The examples of bad ownership are sufficiently numerous to point to systemic failure. A case can be made that, rather than tighter regulation, a more fundamental ownership change is required.’ The report continues,  ‘The supporters trust ownership model appears to us to be one of the positive developments in English football.’ This is encouraging but the recommendations of the enquiry do little...

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Just Another Ordinary Week In Wrexham

As ever, it was down to the supporters of the club to get to what looks like somewhere near the bottom of what has been going on. It was probably too much to hope that, after a unanimous vote at their SGM last week, the Wrexham Supporters Trust would merely be allowed to get on with the job of completing their due diligence and purchasing Wrexham Football Club, but the way in which the story has continued to expand out over the last six days is enough to start to cast doubt over whether several of the key players in this ridiculously distended story – and not, as we will make clear, players from the side of the trust organisation itself – have an agenda which is intent on torpedoing the bid for their own ends. The story’s new direction began at the end of last week with a leaked email. The email was sent from one member of the WST board – Rob Parry – to another. Or, at least, that was the intention. The email, which stated that “I suspect we should expect DS [manager Dean Saunders] to resign or threaten… the team’s form isn’t our ally here!!!” (possibly in relation to the possibility of budget cuts at some point in the future when the WST takes over the running of the club or because Saunders is understood...

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On The Subject Of Deadlines… A Big Week For Wrexham & Plymouth Argyle

Two clubs are facing deadlines in the near future after months of insecurity, but while Wrexham now seem likely to be headed towards a brighter future, Plymouth Argyle supporters are probably at the point now of not believing anyone until the take-over of their club is ratified by the Football League. Ian King will be looking at Wrexham’s day of destiny, but first here’s Mark Murphy on the continuing uncertainty at Home Park. The – Increasingly Frequent – Plymouth Argyle Update   If Peter Ridsdale is to be believed – and who could ever doubt him – yesterday in Plymouth was the first day of “absolutely the biggest week in the history of (Plymouth Argyle).” And, in the sense that it could be the last week in the history of the club, Argyle acting chairman and prospective football club owner Ridsdale was – for once – right.  After weeks and months of meaningless deadlines, there is a strong sense among Argyle fans, officials, takeover protagonists and observers that this is, in fact, it; that this coming Friday August 26th is a proper deadline. Cross it and Argyle could be shot. There remain two discrete obstacles in the way of the takeover. Nothing major, mind. Just the legality of the Bishop International Limited (BIL) purchase of Argyle’s ground and surrounding land assets; and the legal issues – football and general –...

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Wrexham’s Extraordinary Day

It certainly went to the wire, of that much we can be certain. In fact, it could even be said that it went into extra-time. Eventually, however, the immediate future of Wrexham Football Club was secured by the only people in this particular story that have given every impression of being completely trustworthy from the very start – the fans themselves. This act of saving the club, though, required a level of fund-raising which proved beyond any reasonable doubt that if this club is to have anything like a prosperous future, it must come from those that banded together, cajoled and donated in order raise an extraordinary amount of money in an even more extraordinary amount of time to save it in its absolute hour of need. Following the scheduled meeting of the Football Conference last Thursday, it quickly became apparent that the league itself was far from satisfied with the assurances given by those currently running the club, and the league demanded a that a bond or bank guarantee of £250,000 be lodged with them by the end of the following money. No formal sanction for failing to do so was announced at the time, but it was widely believed that the club would be prevented from starting the season if it was not done. It was a harsh adjudication – draconian, some might say – but the...

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