Tag: Wolverhampton Wanderers

Match Of The Week 2: Birmingham City 1-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers

Perhaps the idea of “High Noon” was that of a television executive. If it was, the Premier League supporters could probably be forgiven for throwing a few curses his way for scheduling two matches for midday on a Sunday lunchtime in the middle of a Bank Holiday weekend. The supporters of Birmingham City and Wolverhampton Wanderers haven’t come off as badly from this as those of Newcastle United, who would have needed to leave for Anfield at a time that could be credibly described as “late last night”, but still… midday? These West Midlands derby matches have a reputation for occasionally getting a little rambunctious, but would giving the overwhelming of majority of Birmingham and Wolves supporters that don’t much fancy the idea of thumping anyone an hour to go to the pub be such a crime? Even a kick-off this early is unlikely to mean that nerves won’t be jangling at St Andrews this morning. Birmingham City will be playing in Europe next season thanks to their League Cup win, but they are still in danger of being relegated at the end of this season. They are currently on thirty-eight points with the “normal” threshold of forty looking as if even that might not be enough to keep anybody safe this season. A win today, against a Wolves team whose defence has been rather porous over the last...

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Steve Bull: Happy Birthday To The Tipton Skin

Sometimes, a birthday or anniversary can come along that makes you feel very old, or very young. Confirmation this morning that today is the forty-sixth birthday of the former Wolverhampton Wanderers striker Steve Bull managed both of the above, simultaneously. A lot has changed over the last twenty years, not least of which is a greater appreciation of the finer technical aspects of the game. Even twenty years ago, however, Bull was something of a throwback, the cropped hair and unassuming manner seemed to invoke a bygone era even before the brave new world of the Premier League. The phrase “Boy’s Own” was thrown around a lot when referring to Steve Bull. He was an onomatopoeic player, as blunt as the two vowels that make up his name, and was almost the very last of a generation that is now all but extinct. In addition to this, there was something of the comic book character about his entire career. He didn’t call to mind the clean cut golden boy Roy Race, of course – he was far too gritty to draw such a comparison – but there was something about his demeanour and gait that was more reminiscent of a hero that didn’t even play football, Alf Tupper, Victor magazine’s “Tough Of The Track”, yet these comparisons were as much about his back story as they were about his...

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Molineux Lays On A Fitting Tribute To Dean Richards

After a testosterone-fuelled lunch at Anfield, the real world gate-crashed at Molineux this afternoon. At the quickest, faintest of glances, one could have been mistaken this for a normal Sunday afternoon match in the Black Country. The ground was full and, as the teams emerged onto the pitch, “Fanfare For The Common Man” blared at full volume over the public address system, as it always does when the teams take to the pitch at Molineux. Yet today was no ordinary day at this most famous of old grounds. Today was the day that Wolverhampton Wanderers and Tottenham Hotspur came together to mark the passing of their former defender Dean Richards, who was taken away from us at the unspeakably young age of thirty-six last week. His widow and two young children were there, as were representatives from Richards’ two other former clubs, Bradford City and Southampton. An appropriately handsome and lavish tribute to Richards was read out, and this was followed by a thunderous round of applause from the Molineux crowd. It was a perfectly adjudged tribute to a player that was clearly highly regarded at each of the clubs that he played for and the management, players and supporters of Wolverhampton Wanderers deserve warm applause themselves for not covering the day in mawkishness, instead opting for an understated yet notably and obviously heartfelt tribute to a player that...

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91 Years Of Football Through 7 Players: From Leeds United, 1920 to West Ham, 2011

An article on the front page of the When Saturday Comes website bemoaned the airbrushing from history of anything from before the beginning of the Premier League, but the time-line of football is considerably more textured than this. With this is mind (and from a post on the WSC forum, which is probably the best place on the internet to discuss football), here is a rambling six degrees of speculation. From Leeds United’s first season in the Football League to West Ham United vs Blackpool in the Premier League on the 2nd February 2011 in seven players. Feel free to have a go at this in the comments and knock mine into a proverbial cocked hat. Centre-half Ernie Hart joined Leeds United in September 1920, a year after they were formed. He was a regular in that team – he left Leeds in 1936 – alongside… …Jack Milburn (cousin of Jackie), who signed for Leeds in November 1928. Jack was in the Leeds team until the outbreak of war in 1939, and in January 1938 Leeds signed the sixteen year-old winger… …David Cochrane, who went straight into the first team and became a regular himself. David’s career was interrupted by the war, but he re-signed for Leeds after it and, in April 1949, he played alongside… …John Charles, who played for Leeds for nine years, before going to Juventus...

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Match Of The Midweek 2: Liverpool 0-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers

There comes, perhaps, a point when there can be no further glossing over of it all. Upon the full-time whistle at Anfield this evening, Roy Hodgson looked defeated, and not just in terms of this particular football match. He was carrying the gaunt expression of a man that is surely now only living on borrowed time and it is difficult to imagine how this situation can resolve itself with any dignity for the manager. Returning home this evening, flicking through the newspapers tomorrow morning, some Liverpool supporters may look up the table to see how far they are from the Champions League places. Others may look down the table to see how far removed they are from the relegation positions. They are, of course, considerably closer to the latter than the former. It is also worth considering, however, that there are still eight teams below them in the table. Tonight, though, wasn’t entirely about Roy Hodgson. To suggest that he can be solely responsible for such a lifeless display from the team is over-stretching the potential of his powers somewhat and the Liverpool players themselves need to take a long, hard look at themselves and their attitudes this evening. The Wolves goal came eleven minutes into the second half, but Liverpool seldom so much as threatened the Wolves goal in the remaining thirty-five minutes or so of the match....

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