Tag: Wolverhampton Wanderers

91 Years Of Football Through 7 Players: From Leeds United, 1920 to West Ham, 2011

An article on the front page of the When Saturday Comes website bemoaned the airbrushing from history of anything from before the beginning of the Premier League, but the time-line of football is considerably more textured than this. With this is mind (and from a post on the WSC forum, which is probably the best place on the internet to discuss football), here is a rambling six degrees of speculation. From Leeds United’s first season in the Football League to West Ham United vs Blackpool in the Premier League on the 2nd February 2011 in seven players. Feel free to have a go at this in the comments and knock mine into a proverbial cocked hat. Centre-half Ernie Hart joined Leeds United in September 1920, a year after they were formed. He was a regular in that team – he left Leeds in 1936 – alongside… …Jack Milburn (cousin of Jackie), who signed for Leeds in November 1928. Jack was in the Leeds team until the outbreak of war in 1939, and in January 1938 Leeds signed the sixteen year-old winger… …David Cochrane, who went straight into the first team and became a regular himself. David’s career was interrupted by the war, but he re-signed for Leeds after it and, in April 1949, he played alongside… …John Charles, who played for Leeds for nine years, before going to Juventus...

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Match Of The Midweek 2: Liverpool 0-1 Wolverhampton Wanderers

There comes, perhaps, a point when there can be no further glossing over of it all. Upon the full-time whistle at Anfield this evening, Roy Hodgson looked defeated, and not just in terms of this particular football match. He was carrying the gaunt expression of a man that is surely now only living on borrowed time and it is difficult to imagine how this situation can resolve itself with any dignity for the manager. Returning home this evening, flicking through the newspapers tomorrow morning, some Liverpool supporters may look up the table to see how far they are from the Champions League places. Others may look down the table to see how far removed they are from the relegation positions. They are, of course, considerably closer to the latter than the former. It is also worth considering, however, that there are still eight teams below them in the table. Tonight, though, wasn’t entirely about Roy Hodgson. To suggest that he can be solely responsible for such a lifeless display from the team is over-stretching the potential of his powers somewhat and the Liverpool players themselves need to take a long, hard look at themselves and their attitudes this evening. The Wolves goal came eleven minutes into the second half, but Liverpool seldom so much as threatened the Wolves goal in the remaining thirty-five minutes or so of the match....

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Match Of The Week: Wigan Athletic 2-0 Wolverhampton Wanderers

During their season in the third tier during the late 1990s, Manchester City supporters had a song that summed up their feeling of disbelief at the turn for the worse that their club’s fortunes had taken: “We’re Not Really Here”. This lunchtime, Wigan Athletic have taken this to its logical conclusion by being not actually there. There are gaping holes in the crowd for this lunchtime kick-off, most likely on account of the Rugby League Challenge Cup final being played today. To this extent, the town of Wigan remains, in sporting terms, conflicted. Yet this is an important match, in its own way. The nature of the league programme means that there is a tendency for the points accumulated at the end of the season to be treated as more important than those won earlier on in the season but, of course, they’re not. If either of these two clubs wants seriously bolster its chances of avoiding the relegation trapdoor, picking up points from matches like this is not far from essential. Take a moment, if you will, to consider the amount of preparation that a professional football club puts into its match on a Saturday afternoon – the training, the tactical preparation, the logistical side of matters and the travelling supporters, who give up the majority of their Saturday afternoons (and, let us not forget, a reasonably voluminous...

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Match Of The Week: Wolverhampton Wanderers 1-1 Newcastle United

Of all the cod-psychological theories that envelop the Premier League, the theory of Second Season Syndrome is one of those that has the most meat on it. It runs something like this. Upon their elevation to the Premier League, many newly-promoted clubs will have enough momentum that sees them pick up enough points to guarantee their survival in their first season. During the following summer, however, the challenge arguably becomes even greater. New signings, purchased with the first of that lovely Premier League lolly, may undermine the spirit within the squad of players. Complacency, as a sense of entitlement sets in and the memory of just how difficult it was to get into the Premier League and stay there starts to fade, starts to grow. These factors end up outweighing the actual ability of the players that the club has, and the second season becomes the one that sees them relegated back to the Championship. There are, of course, plenty of examples to back this up. Two years ago, Hull City thundered up the Premier League with an extraordinary run before finding their level. Results elsewhere meant that they survived their first season, but the second proved to be too much for them. They now sit seventh from bottom in the Championship, with rumours of a potential financial implosion continuing to circle. The problem with such theories is that...

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The Premier League Previews 2010/11, Part 20: Wolverhampton Wanderers – Age Before Beauty?

For a team that won three league titles in the 1950s, and has four FA Cup wins to it’s name, last season was as good as it’s been for a whole generation of Wolverhampton Wanderers fans, seeing as it will be 29 years since the club last embarked on consecutive seasons in the top flight. Mick McCarthy made some controversial decisions last year – his fielding of a virtual reserve side at Old Trafford by far the most standout one. Some of his other decisions now seem hypocritical, considering how defensive Wolves were last season, and how McCarthy spent the last few weeks of June criticising every World Cup minnow who dared to play for a draw in the group stages. However, it is some of the decisions that McCarthy made in his earlier years that may shape the season that Wolves are to have. At a first glance, Wolves don’t appear to have an old squad. Goalkeeper Marcus Hahnemann is 38, and captain Jody Craddock may only be three years younger, but the third oldest player at the club is 29 year old left back Matt Hill. Digging deeper however, and right back Richard Stearman turns 23 on Thursday, which is a little bit of a problem, because Stearman is the 27th oldest member of the squad. In a season where the Premier League have brought in a...

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