Tag: Wimbledon

The Twohundredpercent Play-Off Jamboree: Wimbledon 6-1 Fleetwood Town (8-1 Agg)

“Not in the wider interests of football”. We mentioned this astonishing statement, made on the subject of a new club starting in SW19 at the time that Wimbledon FC was being franchised to Milton Keynes, during our report of the first leg of this evening’s Blue Square Premier Play-Off between AFC Wimbledon and Fleetwood Town, but it is a statement that cannot and should not be repeated enough when mentioning tonight’s home team. Nine years on, the hollow ring that were always likely to reverberate around those words could scarcely sound more empty. That a club – any club – could make it from the depths of the Combined Counties League to the cusp of a place in the Football League would be astonishing enough. That it could be done at a club that has been owned and run by its supporters, on a sustainable basis and on a bed of principles the represent something firmly positive about our game is one of the great achievements in British football over the last ten years or so. One might reasonably wonder where those that turned out at Sandhurst Town for the nascent club’s first match less than a decade ago might have believed that they might be by now. The size of their crowds was always likely to give them degree of competitive edge. The constitutional requirement to be sustainable...

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Play-Off Prices And The Nature Of Value

Value is a relative concept, and it is all the more so in the case of sporting events. In recent times, for example, the standard fall-back position for those that defend the increasingly extortionate prices that many football clubs now charge for season tickets has been the size of the waiting list for season tickets at their club. What happens, however, in the case of a match for which the exact numbers that will turn up is, broadly speaking, unknown? What is the cut-off point at which the casual supporter thinks to themselves that they cannot justify this expense to themselves? We may well find out the answer to this in a couple of weeks’ time, after the announcement of the prices for the final of the Blue Square Premier play-offs. The match is due to be played at The City of Manchester Stadium on the twenty-first of May. It would be something of a surprise, to say the least, if it isn’t played between AFC Wimbledon and Luton Town, considering that these two clubs won their away legs in the semi-finals by two and three goals respectively. This would achieve the significant end of season double-whammy of having thousands of supporters from the south-east of England in Manchester for a play-off final whilst thousands of others, from Manchester City and Stoke City, head in the opposite direction for...

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The Twohundredpercent Play-Off Jamboree: Fleetwood Town 0-2 AFC Wimbledon

The history of football in Fleetwood, Lancashire, is one of boom and bust. The town’s original club, Fleetwood FC, renamed itself Fleetwood Town and were founder members of the Northern Premier League in 1968, before folding in 1976. A new club sprang up the following year, reached the final of the FA Vase in 1985 and won back its place in the Premier Division of the Northern Premier League three years later. It too folded in 1996. The latest incarnation of what we might regard as effectively the same club was founded a year later, and has spent the last fourteen years climbing the same slippery pole as its predecessors. This time last year, they were winning the Blue Square North play-off final against Alfreton Town. Flush with the cash of chairman Andy Pilley, they turned professional during the summer and their first season in the Blue Square Premier has been a resounding success. Their ground, Highbury (the Arsenal links – though not formal – don’t end there; Fleetwood also wear red shirts with white sleeves), has a shiny new stand and the team has rose to fifth place in the Blue Square Premier in their first season in it, setting them up for a play-off semi-final against AFC Wimbledon. Wimbledon, of course, have been here for a year longer than Fleetwood. They led the table for much of...

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Jabberwomble

Twas ploughish, and the slimy dons Did wyre and wimble in the blarn: All milty were the braggados, And the melts raths garn. “Beware the Jabberwomble, my son! The jaws that bite, the claws that catch! Beware the Franchise phoenix, and shun The fluidous Snatcherblatch!” With the Conference National playoff between Fleetwood Town and AFC Wimbledon set to begin at Highbury this week, so continues the slightly obtuse journeys of two clubs seeking entry into the Football League for the first time. Now, while it might seem incredibly odd to consider a club with the name Wimbledon has never before played in league football, we are all well-versed in what became of the Old Centrals. So, while AFC Wimbledon supporters assert the current club traces its roots back to the club founded in 1899, that ten year gap between being initial members of the Premiership to joining the Combined Counties League on the club’s honours page suggests to the uninitiated that there was indeed some kind of restart along the way. In the case of Fleetwood Town, the Lancastrian side has never stepped foot over the non-league line in any of its reincarnations, as no other club of Trawlermen have even gotten this far up the pyramid to date. Stretching back to 1908, the likes of Fleetwood FC and the original Fleetwood Town FC to today’s current club previously known under the guises of...

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Cafe Calcio On Twohundredpercent: Football Impressionism And The Psychology Of Wimbledon

Cafe Calcio is back on London’s Resonance FM this evening at nine o’clock, and you can join Chris Dixon, David Stubbs and Chris Roberts live this evening by clicking here. Alternatively, should you wish to catch the repeat of it, this will be on tomorrow (Saturday) morning at eleven o’clock. Should you be unable to make either of these dates, you can catch up with the podcast version of their show (as well as their archive of other shows) by clicking here. This week, Chris Roberts has been tackling football and impression, and the psychology of “The Crazy Gang”. Football Art Masterclass: Impressionism Impressionism was a French 19th century art movement which marked a momentous break from tradition in European painting. The Impressionists incorporated new scientific research into physics to achieve a more exact representation of colour and tone. The sudden change in the look of these paintings was brought about by a shift in methodology as well, such techniques as applying paint in small touches of pure colour rather than broader strokes or painting out of doors to catch a particular fleeting impression of colour and light. The upshot emphasised the artist’s perception of the subject matter as much as the subject itself. The idea is that  the artist captures the image of an object as someone would see it if they just caught a glimpse of it. Pissaro and Sisley painted the...

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