Tag: Wimbledon

Match Of The Week: AFC Wimbledon 2-3 Bristol Rovers

A lot of people worked very hard for this moment. In modern football, a considerable amount of time, paper and  bandwidth is spent on celebrating a relative few, but at Wimbledon it was the likes of Erik Samuelson, Kris Stewart, Marc Jones and Ivor Heller, who refused to let their club die with a that was brought about by little more than carpet-baggers. Today, though, is not a day for protesting. Today is a day for a celebration. It only, as the song goes, took nine years for AFC Wimbledon to rise from the Combined Counties League, and the glow to come from the club with promotion to the Football League has shone over all of English football during the entire summer. In the midst of all of this excitement, the scale of the challenge facing the club cannot be understated. They lost arguably their two best players – Danny Kedwell and Steven Gregory – during the summer, and on their limited resources, League Two may prove to be a culture shock to supporters considerably more used to winning far more matches than they have been losing each of their opening three matches, all against sides relegated from League One at the end of last season, may prove to be a shock to the system. Indeed, the relegation of their opposition today, Bristol Rovers, at the end of last...

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Those We Have Lost: Wimbledon At Selhurst Park

The next in our “Those We Have Lost” series is a little different to the rest. Wimbledon supporter Tom Nash missed the club’s days at Plough Lane, but by the time that he was old enough he was venturing across south London to see his team play at Selhurst Park. If you would like to contribute to this series – which will be collected together as a page on the site for posterity – please drop us a line using the contact page in the links at the top. I never got to see Wimbledon play at Plough Lane. A steadfastly anti-football dad who would take me to Donnington Park to watch obscure racing formulae took care of that. I can tell you about rainy weekends at Thruxton and Donnington Park, but I can’t tell you about Neville Southall repeatedly kicking the ball over the stands in to the road outside. Given the playing style of the Wombles, the balls were probably only good for one game at best. My first memory of Wimbledon was watching the FA Cup final at home. There was such excitement in the build up to the final, my dad begrudgingly bought my brother and I scarves and rattles, and I clearly remember having a banana milkshake with blue and yellow straws for good luck. I don’t remember too much about the game itself....

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The Twohundredpercent Play-Off Jamboree: Luton Town 0-0 AFC Wimbledon (3-4 Pens)

So it all comes down to ninety minutes. There can, at least, be little debate that this year’s Blue Square Premier play-off final is being played between the two best teams left in the competition, following Crawley Town’s testosterone-fuelled championship win but, as we pan across the banks of empty seats at Eastlands this afternoon, it is difficult not to reflect upon the wisdom of the decision to host the showpiece of this league here – although we are talking here about ticket prices and specifically not about the decision to play the match in Manchester – and wonder what a spectacle the match might have been had it been played in London. The decision was made, however, and we are where we are. It’s also worth pointing out that, while the crowd of 19,000 is clearly a disappointment for this match, it’s worth remembering the fact that even describing it thus is a remarkable comment upon the strength in depth of English football. This, let us not forget, is a match in the fifth division of English football. Both clubs are here this afternoon seeking to take steps towards wronging a right and, while the story of what happened to Wimbledon FC is a well-trodden path, it occasionally feels as if what happened to Luton Town has not received the attention that it deserves. To be clear, the...

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From The Video Archive: Luton Town vs Wimbledon, 1988

AFC Wimbledon play Luton Town in the Blue Square Premier play-off final in Manchester this afternoon and, setting aside concerns about the ticketing arrangements for a moment, there is a definite sense of headiness in the air this morning as supporters of the two clubs head north for the match. For both clubs, there is an obvious sense of injustice that they find themselves in this particular division in the first place. We all know what happened to Wimbledon FC, of course, and that Luton Town were essentially relegated as the result of a punitive point deduction awarded on the basis of the actions of people that had already left the club at the time of the award means that a flame also burns within their supporters, as well. If we rewind the clock by twenty-three years, though, we can see that Wimbledon and Luton Town have been here before. During the 1987/88 season the two clubs had mid-table teams in the First Division and they played each other in the semi-final of the FA Cup that year at White Hart Lane. Wimbledon had beaten West Bromwich Albion, Mansfield Town, Newcastle United and Watford to get there, while Luton Town had beaten Hartlepool United, Southampton, Queens Park Rangers and Portsmouth to get that far. In the other semi-final, Liverpool were playing Nottingham Forest at Hillsborough. We are thrilled –...

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The Twohundredpercent Play-Off Jamboree: Wimbledon 6-1 Fleetwood Town (8-1 Agg)

“Not in the wider interests of football”. We mentioned this astonishing statement, made on the subject of a new club starting in SW19 at the time that Wimbledon FC was being franchised to Milton Keynes, during our report of the first leg of this evening’s Blue Square Premier Play-Off between AFC Wimbledon and Fleetwood Town, but it is a statement that cannot and should not be repeated enough when mentioning tonight’s home team. Nine years on, the hollow ring that were always likely to reverberate around those words could scarcely sound more empty. That a club – any club – could make it from the depths of the Combined Counties League to the cusp of a place in the Football League would be astonishing enough. That it could be done at a club that has been owned and run by its supporters, on a sustainable basis and on a bed of principles the represent something firmly positive about our game is one of the great achievements in British football over the last ten years or so. One might reasonably wonder where those that turned out at Sandhurst Town for the nascent club’s first match less than a decade ago might have believed that they might be by now. The size of their crowds was always likely to give them degree of competitive edge. The constitutional requirement to be sustainable...

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