Tag: Wimbledon

Confirmed: AFC Wimbledon & The FA Cup Match They Emphathically Didn’t Want

In the end, it came about in the most perfunctory way possible. Cambridge City, part-time players from the Premier Division of the Southern Football League, couldn’t live with their full-time opposition and the resounding 6-1 win for the home side was proof, as if it were needed, that for all that we like to talk about the romance of football, the pitch is no place for sentiment and money talks louder than anything else. This was in sharp contrast to the events of Monday evening at Kingsmeadow, of course. York City should have been home and dry by half-time in their FA Cup First Round replay against Wimbledon, but a red card and an equalising goal from out of nowhere changed the complexion of the match towards the end of the first half, although a last minute York equaliser was enough to send this match into thirty minutes of extra time with the home side eventually coming through by the odd goal in seven. Most of those that didn’t want Wimbledon to play their arch nemesis at this time probably knew that the game was up by the time that the full time whistle blew on Monday night, and now supporters of the club have to reach into their consciences and try to make a decision over whether to make the trip north to Buckinghamshire, to survey the estate...

Read More

Never Forgive, Never Forget: The Return Of The Spectre Of The Unwanted FA Cup Match

Here we go again, then. This afternoons draw for the FA Cup Second Round brought about, for the second time in three years, the distinct possibility of AFC Wimbledon having to play MK Dons in the worlds oldest cup competition and this draw is one that will likely provoke heated debate over the next week and a half or so. The first thing to say about this is that it isn’t guaranteed yet. Both clubs have to overcome replays first and, while the likelihood of MK Dons losing theirs at home against Southern League Premier Division side Cambridge City the week after next remains slim, this is a side that has won just one of its last seven matches and has slid down the League One table after a strong start to the season. Meanwhile, whilst Wimbledons one-all draw at Bootham Crescent against York City looks like a creditable enough result from a distance, reports from the match have seemed to indicate that they were more than a little fortunate to come away from this match with a second bite at the cherry. There remains every chance that this match will not take place after all. Still, though, the possibility remains, and it should be added that this is a match that very few AFC Wimbledon supporters want to go ahead, regardless of whatever breathless comments the press will...

Read More

The End Of An Era At AFC Wimbledon

Last night at Kingsmeadow, Wimbledon were beaten by a single deflected goal by Torquay United. It was, by all accounts, a scrappy game, with the home team looking almost chronic in their lack of self confidence, but it was also a match that marked the end of an era. At the full time whistle, manager Terry Brown made a tearful lap of the pitch. This, it turns out, has been the last match in charge for a manager that came to redefine the fortunes of this club in his five and a half years in charge of it. After an extremely slow start to the 2012/13 season, Wimbledon are in the market for a new manager. At the end of the 2006/07 season, AFC Wimbledon seemed to have reached something of a crossroads. Beaten in the play-offs in the Ryman League Premier Division, the club was giving the impression of having stalled, but the appointment of Brown – a non-league journeyman who had previously enjoyed success at Aldershot Town and Hayes – was a canny one. Here was a manager with huge experience of the game at this level, a man with the contacts and respect amongst his peers to bring a different angle to the very difficult job of getting the club promoted from a twenty-four club division with only two promotion places on offer. It could be...

Read More

Ten Years Of AFC Wimbledon: Part 4 – Nature Is Bent On New Beginning And Death Has Not A Chance Of Winning

“It only took nine years” was the song booming from the AFC Wimbledon end of The City of Manchester Stadium at the end of the Blue Square Bet Premier play-off final against Luton Town in May of last year. There was a certain irony to the fact that two clubs from the south-east of England had to travel over two hundred miles to play a match that would ordinarily have been played at Wembley. Big money was winning again, and the scheduling of the Champions League final meant that twenty thousand supporters would have to decamp to the other end of the country for the day. It was no great hardship – after all, how many clubs from the north of England have had to make the same journey in the opposite direction down the years? – but it certainly impacted on the size of the crowd for such a showpiece fixture. It would have been unsurprising to see three times as many people turn out had the match been played in London. If there were some supporters of AFC Wimbledon whose thoughts turned to the possibility of returning to the Football League in August 2002, such a journey must have felt like the footballing equivalent of having to scale Mount Everest. The Combined Counties League, a feeder league to the Ryman League, was the sort of environment in...

Read More

10 Years Of AFC Wimbledon, Part Three – Gazing At The Stars

It was a balmy evening at the end of May 2002 and emotions at The Sir Cyril Black Community Centre in Wimbledon were running high. Two days earlier, the unthinkable had happened. A three-man independent commission set up by the Football Association had, by two votes to one, waved through permission for Wimbledon FC to leave Selhurst Park, its unhappy home for the previous eleven years, and decamp sixty miles north to Milton Keynes in Buckinghamshire. Football franchising had arrived in footballs modern era, and their club was the laboratory animal upon which the experiment would be carried. What were Wimbledon supporters to do? Their club would continue to play at Selhurst Park for another year. Should they continue the protest at the club? Play out the final year and then meekly follow the freak show north? The answers to these questions would end up having far wider-ranging ramifications than most would have thought possible at the time. The Wimbledon Independent Supporters Association (WISA) had been formed seven years earlier, as the permanence of the clubs move to Selhurst Park became increasingly obvious. These were seasoned campaigners who had already played a significant role in seeing off the proposed move to Dublin. Fighting off the Milton Keynes move, however, had proved to be a bridge too far. Perhaps the writing had been on the wall. After all, when the Football Association...

Read More