Tag: West Germany

Video of the Day: Italy vs West Germany, June 1970

The relative irregularity with which international teams meet can throw up some curious statistical anomalies, and one of the most curious of all is that Germany – or West Germany – have never beaten Italy in a competitive match. The two teams meet tomorrow evening in Munich, and this will be the thirty-third meeting of the two sides, and of the previous thirty-two Italy have won fifteen, drawn ten and lost seven, with all of (West) Germany’s wins having come in friendlies, and with the last of these dating all the way back to a match played in Zurich...

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Friendly International: Germany vs England – Live!

Good evening, everybody! I’m going to assume that – unless you actually support one of the dozen or so lower division teams that actually had a match scheduled for this weekend and didn’t have it subsequently called off or abandoned because of a monsoon – you’ve missed your football fix today and that you’re now settling down in front of your television/radio/internet device with a view to entertaining yourself by trying, with the assistance of ITV’s commentary and a substantial amount of ale, to convince yourself that this evening’s friendly match between England and Germany means so much as...

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Video of the Day: England vs West Germany, June 1985

When England take to the pitch to play Germany in Berlin this evening, there will doubtless be many who will attach a significance to this match that goes way beyond it being a mere international friendly being played at an extremely inconvenient time of the year. The matches between these two nations that have had a great significance have assumed this importance because of a broader context. England and (West) Germany have met in a World Cup final, a World Cup semi-final and a World Cup quarter-final. They’ve played in World Cup qualifiers and a European Championship semi-final. Those...

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European Championship Stories: 1972 – West Germany’s Spring Of Absolute Contentment

At the Heysel Stadium in Brussels on the eighteenth of June 1972, West Germany lifted their first major tournament trophy since the 1954 World Cup. Two years later, at the Olympic Stadium in Munich, they lifted the World Cup. Yet it is sometimes said that the team of 1972 is more fondly remembered than the team of two years later, and it is certainly fair to say that the road to these twin victories was not without its problems. For most people under the age of fifty, West Germany and Germany has been a footballing powerhouse at both club and international level, but the introduction of any degree of professional football to the country was relatively late to the country. By the beginning of the 1960s, West Germany still had no single, professional league – rather, the country’s leagues consisted of five regional Oberligen (Premier Leagues) – but clamours for a more unified set-up would intensify with a disappointing performance in the World Cup finals at the start of the new decade. The story of post-war German football begins, of course, with The Miracle Of Bern. West Germany had lost by eight goals to three against Hungary in the group stages of the 1954 World Cup finals, but battled their way through to the finals and, with the good luck of seeing Hungary start the match with an injured Ferenc...

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The Twohundredpercent Vault: When The Two Germanies Collided, 1974

The Cold War spread insiduously into every aspect of life between the end of the second world war and the end of the 1980s, and sport was no exception to this rule, whether it was the Soviets and Americans boycotting each others’ Olympic Games or Bobby Fischer facing off against Boris Spassky at chess in Rekjavik in 1972. Football was no exception to this rule, and perhaps the definitive meeting of captialism and communism on the football pitch came at the 1974 World Cup finals, when West Germany played East Germany in the group stage of the competition. Although the match was played at a time of relative detente in the overall scheme of the war itself, it was played at a time of high tension. The 1972 Olympic Games had been the scene of the Munich hostage crisis, and the recent actions of the Red Army Faction further intensified the nervousness surround the competition. Security was tight to the extent that guards with dogs patrolled the entrance of the West German team’s training camp, and the sense of unease spread into the camp itself, where a dispute over pay that threatened the appearance of several of the squad’s key players. Even the weather seemed to descend into pathetic fallacy, with pouring rain marring much of he early stages of the tournament. The dispute was resolved, but West Germany’s...

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