Tag: Tottenham Hotspur

The Antisemitism Genie Has Long Out Of The Bottle At White Hart Lane… And Elsewhere

You kind of knew that here was an accident waiting to happen as soon as David Cameron got involved in it all. Asked by the Jewish Chronicle what he thought of the FA’s statement last week, which reiterated its belief that the word “Yid” should not be used in any context at a football ground and warning that its use could amount to a criminal offence that would leave fans at risk of being banned and prosecuted, the Prime Minister responded by saying, “You have to think of the mens rea [a principle of law which suggests that “an act is not culpable unless the mind is guilty”]. There’s a difference between Spurs fans self-describing themselves as ‘Yids’ and someone calling someone a Yid as an insult. You have to be motivated by hate. Hate speech should be prosecuted – but only when it’s motivated by hate.” Spurs supporters have long self-identified as ‘Yids’, in no small part on account of the antisemitism that the club’s support has faced for many years. Anybody who has attended a match between Spurs and, say, Arsenal, Chelsea or West Ham United will be fully aware of how poisonous the atmosphere can become at these matches, and there is a long history of fairly appalling behaviour by rival supporters – the explicitly antisemitic attacks on Spurs supporters in Rome last year, for example...

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The 200% Premier League Pre-Season: Tottenham Hotspur

Gareth Bale, it would appear, casts a long shadow. Sitting in his bedroom pouting over the apparent “injury” – or, to put it another way, a lack of match fitness which means that he probably won’t be starting the new season for Spurs – that will last until conveniently after the transfer window closes, it would appear that this player has burned his bridges with the club, and the manner of his apparently impending departure means that it may be difficult for many of the club’s supporters to look back upon his time at the club with a great deal of affection. But Spurs supporters, who have seen their team plundered for its choicest assets with wearying regularity over recent years, are probably more used to this sensation than most. One man, however, does not make a team and, whilst the loss of Bale is clearly a blow to a club for whom the end of the rainbow that is perpetual Champions League qualification and making a serious bid for the Premier League title remains tantalisingly out of reach, this particular smear shouldn’t be allowed to completely mask what has otherwise been a very successful summer in the transfer market for the club. For a club that has previously been a little dithersome in the transfer market, the arrival at White Hart Lane over the last couple of months...

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Spurs Supporters Have A Right To Protection In Europe

After the infamous riot at the FA Cup quarter-final match between Luton Town and Millwall, senior representatives of the Football Association were summoned to Downing Street to discuss the matter with the Prime Minister. ‘What are you going to do about your hooliganism?’, asked Margaret Thatcher, perhaps mindful of the extent to which divide and rule can be a useful tool for a politician. Ted Croker, the secretary and chief executive of the Football Association, replied, ‘We don’t want this made public, but these people are society’s problems and we don’t want your hooligans in our sport, prime minister.’ It was a risky policy to say this to a politician who may have been at the point of banning professional football altogether – it is perhaps instructive that Croker was subsequently the first person leaving such a senior position within the FA not to receive a knighthood – and it might also be argued that, at that particular time, it might have been unwise of somebody from the FA to be trying to fight back in the way Croker did, but he did, in his comment, touch on a fundamental truth about the relationship between football and society in a broader sense. To a point, football is merely a reflection of the society within which it exists, though politicians, for whom this is an obviously uncomfortable truth, will usually...

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Footballs Problem Or Something Wider? The Problem With The Blame Game After Rome

There may not be appropriate words to sum up the absolute revulsion that wells up when considering the events of the early hours of Thursday morning in Rome. Two supporters of Tottenham Hotspur were stabbed in a bar in the city in what looks distinctly like a pre-meditated attack which, as if such behaviour isn’t low enough already, was also accompanied with an unhealthy dollop of antisemitism. Over the last twenty-four hours or so, there have been conflicting reports regarding whose “fault” – if collective fault can be assigned to the decision of someone to push a blade into somebody else for any reason whatsoever – it all was, but the arrest this evening of two Roma ultras would seem to indicate that this may have been more orchestrated than merely some Lazio supporters offering a dispiritingly familiar Roman welcome to the supporters of Tottenham Hotspur Football Club. Considering what happened last night, though, one might have hoped for a little more sensitivity from the supporters of that particular club once the teams took to the pitch at the Olympic Stadium for the Europa League match between Lazio and Tottenham Hotspur last night, but sections of the Olympic curva didn’t even seem capable of that. Antisemitic chanting was clearly audible during the early stages of the match. It hardly seems unreasonable to enquire as per why perhaps, just perhaps,...

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100 Owners: Number 81 – Irving Scholar (Tottenham Hotspur & Nottingham Forest)

In June 1984, shortly after bringing Tottenham Hotspur its first European trophy in twelve years, Keith Burkinshaw left White Hart Lane for the last time. Greeted by the press outside the ground, he gesticulated over his shoulder towards the rear of the shiny new stand behind him. ‘There used to be a football club over there’, he is said to have spat with contempt. These words may even have been apocryphal, but they turned out to be more prescient than anybody at that time than anybody could have imagined at the time. Whilst many might contend that football in Englands revolution began with the beginning of the Premier League in 1992, the truth of the matter is that the formation of this league was in many respects the end of a story rather than the beginning of one, and if that story has a birthplace then we could contend that this was at White Hart Lane. The application of Thatcherism to our national pastime began in a working class corner of North London, and its champion was a Monaco-based property developer in his late thirties: Irving Scholar. Footballs decline as a spectator sport from the late 1950s on has been well documented, and Tottenham Hotspur itself declined throughout the 1960s and 1970s. Spurs had become the first club to win the league and cup double in 1961, but these...

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