Tag: Sheffield Wednesday

Sheffield Wednesday Send Their Boys To The Slaughter

Flashing across the BBC website on Sunday afternoon came a result which couldn’t help but raise an eyebrow or two: Alfreton Town 14-0 Sheffield Wednesday. The truth was less exciting than the initial rush might have led some Sheffield United supporters to hope. Wednesday hadn’t put out their first team for this match against a club from the Blue Square Premier, but neither had they dressed eleven scarecrows in blue and white striped shirts and placed them strategically around the pitch in the hope that no-one would notice. This score was achieved – if “achieved” is quite the right word – against a team made up of the players from the Sheffield Wednesday academy. The question to be asked at this stage, of course, is what exactly Sheffield Wednesday exactly hoped to achieve from this fixture. Is it possible that an official from the club took a glance at the name of the opposition, believed them to be considerably lower down football’s food chain than they actually are and decided to send the kids in the expectation that this would be a Sunday afternoon stroll in the park? Well, this is possible, and the extent to which it would be an understatement was borne out by the result. Alfreton were promoted as the champions of the Blue Square North at the end of last season and, while they –...

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The Twohundredpercent Vault: Steel City Blues

Our summer trawl through the Twohundredpercent vaults continues with this video on the decline of Sheffield football. More than a decade before “The Full Monty”, the decline of the city of Sheffield and the effect of the collapse of the city’s steel industry was already well documented. This week’s Video Of The Week goes back to 1984. “Steel City Blues” traces the decline of the city and ties it together with Sheffield Wednesday’s attempts to get back into the First Division for the first time since 1970. The previous decade and a half had been a tough one for Wednesday, with the club having fallen into the Third Division and having only narrowly avoided relegation into the Fourth Division in 1976, but they managed to get promotion back in 1980 under Jack Charlton and almost made the FA Cup Final from Division Two in 1983. This film, in three ten minute parts, is a time piece that tells a story of industrial and sporting decline, but also manages to end on a positive note. Follow Twohundredpercent on Twitter...

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Friday Picture: I Got Stripes

Tomorrow, as you probably know, is the FA Cup Final between Manchester City and Stoke City. Editorial discretion prevents Dotmund from saying who he will be supporting. However, historical facts are indiscreet things indeed and as your correspondent has discovered, the shirt on your back may prove to be the very thing keeping you from your ambitions. Click for bigger There’s more of Dotmund‘s art here. Twitter-wise, you can follow Twohundredpercent here. Don’t follow Dotmund though; he is an...

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Custodians, Fans And Ownership: From Arsenal To Wrexham

The Arsenal take-over looks like being a long way from the toxic take-overs of The Glazers and Gillett & Hicks. But, as SJ Maskell writes, custodianship is about doing more than saying and doing the right things and the real power in the game lies in the majority ownership of shares. I have a friend who is an Arsenal Fan. He is also an Arsenal shareholder. Not as a member of the Arsenal Trust or of the Fanshare Scheme but in his own right. I move in elevated circles, as you can see. The history of these particular shares is interesting. It is well known that in 1913 Sir Henry Norris moved Arsenal to Highbury in a bold move to rescue a club that was struggling financially. During the close season the pitch, terraces and turnstiles were built and the grandstand started. Sir Henry raised what was then a vast sum, £125,000, to build the ground. What doesn’t seem to appear anywhere in the history of Arsenal online is that extra money was raised by supporters ‘chucking money into a hat in return for shares,’ as my friend puts it. Five shares for £5 was the deal. My friend’s grandfather donated his £5 to help the club. The share issue was seen as largely irrelevant at the time – a curio which allowed you to have tea and biscuits...

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A Rhyme for Captain Blade and Ozzie Owl

We use a familiar old nursery rhyme to record a tale for two of Sheffield’s proudest clubs. It somehow seems appropriate to use a children’s song when discussing matters relating to the birthplace of football. We omit the weekend bit in the limerick though, as there appears little at the moment to suggest things are bonny or blithe in the Steel City. Monday’s Child is fair full of face… Having previously overtaken Sheffield Wednesday as the bigger club in the birthplace of football, Sheffield United entered its final match of the 2006/2007 season needing a draw to Wigan or a defeat by West Ham United to eventual champions Manchester United to retain their Premiership status.  After several years of recording losses to spend their way back into the top flight, the Blades had finally recorded a pre-tax profit for their troubles and were anxious to be given a reprieve from relegation. As for the Owls, the 2006/2007 season saw them come within striking distance of a Premiership return.  Having struggled to remain in the Championship–much less play against the likes of Liverpool and Arsenal–Sheffield Wednesday recovered from a disastrous start to the campaign to finish 9th in the Championship table.  Brian Laws looked an inspired choice to lead Wednesday back to its rightful place amongst the other big clubs in England and like their city rivals were turning in...

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