Tag: Queens Park Rangers

Match Of The Past: Queens Park Rangers

We have another six matches from the past this morning, today featuring a club which survived relegation by virtue of results elsewhere.: Queens Park Rangers. QPR have always been a relatively popular choice for the television companies, not least because of the close proximity of Loftus Road to the BBCs Television Centre, although it is worth pointing out that the majority of these highlights actually come from the cameras of ITV. Our first match comes from January 1972, seeing QPR travel north to Kenilworth Road to play Luton Town and our second match also sees them on their travels, this time to the West Midlands to play Wolverhampton Wanderers at Molineux in October 1973. The 1975/76 season was Queens Park Rangers’ best ever in the league, and our third match is the final match of that season at home to Leeds United, a match which the team needed to win and hope that Liverpool dropped points in their final match in order to lift the title. We then skip forward to 1982 to see a Second Division Rangers play their first ever FA Cup semi-final, at Highbury against First Division West Bromwich Albion. Next up is a second trip to Molineux, this time for a match from the top of the Second Division from December 1982 against Wolverhampton Wanderers, and our final match comes from January 1992 and sees...

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Has Joey Barton Been Given The Right Ban For The Wrong Reason?

The FA has passed down it’s judgement on Joey Barton, and he has been suspended for a total of twelve games for his misdemeanours in the last game of the season against Manchester City. The first four games of the ban cover the sending off for violent conduct, plus an extra game ban for it being Barton’s second sending off of the season – every time a player gets sent off more than once in a season in England, they have an extra game added to their suspension for eqch subsequent dismissal. In that respect the other games are for the two incidents after referee Mike Dean produced the red card – kicking out at Sergio Aguero, and attempting to headbutt Vincent Kompany. From the outset, it appeared that there were two likely ways that the incidents would have been treated. The first was that each offence would have been treated as another act of violent conduct worthy of a sending off, and therefore would have been treated like Barton’s third and fourth red cards of the season, bringing a five game ban for the kick and a six game ban for the headbutt, meaning that Barton could feasibly have been suspended for a total of fifteen games. The second way was that because Mike Dean did not produce subsequent red cards, the kick and attempted headbutt would be...

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Somehow, Somehow, Somehow… Manchester City Are The Premier League Champions

Forty-four years ago, Manchester City broke their record transfer fee and splashed out £60,000 on Francis Lee from Bolton Wanderers. Several months later, they celebrated their first English championship for thirty-one years. At the start of this season, they broke that transfer record again and it was the man whose arrival at The City of Manchester Stadium did this, the £38m Sergio Aguero, who scored an almost inconceivable goal three minutes into stoppage-time to bring the title back to the club on an afternoon of emotional extremes which encapsulated why we love and loathe this beautiful, extraordinary, sanity-testing game. At five to three this afternoon, their job was easy. A win at home against a relegation-threatened Queens Park Rangers would be enough to do it. Anything else, and they would be reliant upon Manchester United failing to take all three points from their trip to Wearside to play Sunderland. The stage was set for an afternoon that might have failed to live up to expectations. After all, Manchester City’s home form this season has been little short of sensational and Queens Park Rangers have carried something of a haunted look about them over the last few weeks. It hardly seemed inconceivable that Manchester City could bag an early goal, close the game out and leave us wondering what all the hype had been about. This, though, is Manchester City,...

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The Spectre Of Goalline Technology Reappears

Over the weekend, the debate over goalline technology resurfaced as Queens Park Rangers defender Clint Hill’s header against Bolton Wanderers clearly crossed the line with assistant referee Bob Pollock claiming he was unable to see due to a Bolton defender on the line blocking his view. Hot on the heels of the International Football Association Board’s (IFAB) announcement that they were committed to accepting technology, and that they would be reviewing two systems in the summer. It now seems inevitable that goalline technology will be introduced to football sooner rather than later, and many media outlets were unable to contain their glee at this development, with one sportswriter on Sky Sports Sunday Supplement claiming that it was football’s embarrassment that it had so far resisted the introduction of technology, although like the rest of the pro-technology lobby, no-one comes up with an answer to some of the logistical questions raised here two years ago. But does the media’s agenda just lie with wanting to improving the game, or is there more to it? The rolling report on the incident on Sky Sports News was revealing. As well as a plea from Sky Sports’ main analyser Gary Neville saying that technology has to come in because of the sheer number of times these incidents have decided championships and relegations, and how replays can give an instant decision on whether the...

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Queens Park Rangers And A Four Year Plan In Ninety Minutes

Mat Hodgson could probably fit a quart in a pint pot as a party trick, which is just as well. The director of “The Four-Year Plan” had enough material from the reign of motor-racing tycoon Flavio Briatore, and others, at west London club Queens Park Rangers for either (a) “an entire conference” (Fawlty Towers, 1979) or (b) six one hour episodes of a documentary series. “At least it wasn’t called the “five-year plan”, a friend noted, unaware of the Nazi connotations of the actual title. But only a warped sense of perspective would lead you to draw any parallels between 1930s Germany and 2007 Shepherd’s Bush; a sense of perspective such as Briatore’s, in fact. Hodgson must have known straightaway that Briatore would be the film’s star. Whether he every conceivable emotional Italian stereotype from QPR’s directors’ box, or was a disembodied, unheard presence on the end of a mobile phone, Briatore dominated the first hour of the film. And it was surely no co-incidence that his presence, on or off camera, was in inverse proportion to QPR’s on-field success, though this may have been down to clever editing. Early shots of the directors’ box focused on both the front row and Briatore’s seat in row two. Later shots, from a not-noticeably different camera position, focused entirely on the front row. So when later shots of directors’ box celebrations...

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