Tag: Preston North End

Video of the Day: Hull City vs Preston North End, September 1984

Staffordshire-born Brian Horton may never quite have scaled the heights of either fame or fortune as a player, but in almost six hundred appearances for Port Vale, Brighton & Hove Albion and Luton Town, he earned a reputation as a solid, dependable midfielder, and played not only in the Brighton team that was promoted to the First Division for the first time in the club’s history in 1979 but also in the Luton Town team that won were promoted to the top flight as champions of the Second Division four years later. Horton was appointed as the player-manager of...

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Tom Finney: The Loss Of One Of Football’s Great Gentlemen

There will be tears at Deepdale this afternoon, of course, and understandably so. After all, the announcement of the death of Tom Finney yesterday at the age of ninety-one has brought the curtain down on one of football’s most enduring love affairs, that of the modest player blessed with abilities beyond the reach of all bar a select few and the club that he represented with such distinction for so many years. But there will also be celebration. Each and every Preston North End player will wear a shirt bearing his name, and there will be as much applause as there will be silence. A life so well lived deserves such treatment. His was a career played out in the years immediately prior to the invasion of television cameras that we take so much for granted these days. As such, perhaps the most appropriate way in which we can assess his impact on the landscape of post-war English football is from the recollections of his contempories. Bill Shankly, who played alongside Finney at Preston, for example, commented on the ability gap between the winger and the rest of his team that, “Tom should claim income tax relief… for his ten dependants,” and that, “Tom Finney would have been great in any team, in any match and in any age… even if he had been wearing an overcoat.” It was...

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Match Of The Past: Preston North End

We continue our series of archive videos of the clubs of Football League One this morning with one of the twelve founder members of the Football League and the first champions of England in 1889, Preston North End. We don’t have footage, of course, of their first unbeaten season in the Football League, but we do have six matches from the years between 1905 and 1992, kicking off with some Mitchell & Kenyon footage of a match between Preston and Aston Villa from 1905. Our next match is from during the Second World War, and features Preston playing Arsenal in the 1941 Football League War Cup final in front of a crowd of 60,000 people at Wembley (Preston won the replay of this match by two goals to one, in case you were wondering.) Our next two matches come from the 1960s. In 1964, Preston North End made the final of the FA Cup again, and our third match is more news footage, this time from British Movietone, of their quarter-final trip to The Manor Ground to play Oxford United. This is followed by a full-length episode of Match Of The Day from Deepdale in March 1966, which saw Preston at home against Manchester United, again in the quarter-finals of the FA Cup. Our final two games come from the colour television era. We have a home league match...

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When A Chairman Isn’t A Chairman: Part Three Of The Riddler Trilogy

If the Insolvency Service (IS) had wanted to really punish Preston North End “chairman of football” Peter Ridsdale for his recently-revealed derelictions of directorship duties, they would not have stopped at barring him from holding company directorships for seven-and-a-half-years. They would surely have barred him from any personal PR-activities. No setpiece interviews by compliant journalists about how Leeds United wasn’t his fault, or how he ‘saved’ Barnsley and Plymouth Argyle (and CERTAINLY nothing about any five-figure monthly salary he might or might not have been paid at Plymouth while Argyle office staff went unpaid). In fact, if the IS had banned Ridsdale talking about himself in any conceivably public forum, it would guarantee that Ridsdale would not be a naughty financial boy again. Ridsdale was this week found by “Company Investigations North, part of the IS” to have “acted improperly and in breach of his duties” as a “director of WH Sports Group Ltd.”, WHSG was his “football consultancy firm” which went pop in April 2009, during his particularly fraught time as Cardiff City chairman. This is financial law euphemism for Ridsdale trousering WHSG’s money. The Manchester-based branch of the IS found that Ridsdale “caused” (!) £347,000 of WHSG’s money to end up in “personal bank accounts in his own name” between May 2007 and April 2009. The money was “for services provided to a football club” and was...

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Peter Ridsdale & The Question Of What Constitutes A “Chairman” Or “Director”

We could argue, perhaps, that there is one set of rules for the well-to-do and another for the rest of us. Peter Ridsale, latterly of Leeds United, Barnsley, Cardiff City, Plymouth Argyle and currently at Preston North End, has been disqualified from acting as a company director for seven and a half years following an investigation carried out by Insolvency Service into the collapse of into the collapse of his company WH Sports Group Limited (WHSG), which provided sports and leisure consultancy services to football clubs from 2003 on. This company collapsed into administration in 2009 owing almost £478,698, of which the overwhelming majority – £442,353 – was owed to HMRC in form or another. If that money had, say, been illegally claimed in benefits, the guilty party would probably looking at a lengthy jail term for his actions. Tax and insolvency law, however, are different. The findings of the investigations – and the below is a list that was not disputed by Ridsdale himself – ran as follows: Payments totalling £347,000 for services provided by WHSG to a football club at which he was chairman, being paid into his personal bank account between May 2007 and March 2009 instead of to the company’s account. Non-disclosure of relevant transactions to the companys liquidator, who was subsequently told of these transactions by the football club itself. Failure to ensure that...

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