Tag: Portsmouth

Video of the Day: Wimbledon vs Portsmouth, January 1987

Wimbledon play Portsmouth this evening at Kingsmeadow in a League Two match between the two teams most likely to make up the last two play-off places in a couple of weeks time. Indeed, the winners of this match will be home and dry, in that respect. Portsmouth had started this season as the favourites to get promoted back and have under-achieved, a little. Meanwhile Wimbledon, for whom life in the Football League had become rather a humdrum existence, have blossomed in the second half of this season, catapulting themselves upwards in a display that has justified their faith in...

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Video of the Day: Fulham vs Portsmouth, September 1983

At the start of September 1983, Fulham Football Club was experiencing a little bit of a hangover. Requiring a win to get promoted back into the First Division of the Football League for the first time since 1968, Fulham found themselves involved in the story of the day, when their match was abandoned with two minutes left to play following repeated pitch invasions by Derby supporters whose team needed a win themselves in order to avoid dropping into the Third Division just eight years after being the champions of England. Those last two minutes were never played, and Leicester...

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Video of the Day: Portsmouth vs Aston Villa, January 1986

This year’s FA Cup Third Round replays kick off this evening and it’s unlikely that the results of this week’s matches can be as moribund as they were the first time around. One of the teams replaying this week is Aston Villa, who have now taken four points from their last two Premier League matches and are starting to show signs of being a football team again. Thirty years ago this month Villa were also away in the Third Round of the FA Cup, this time against Portsmouth of the Second Division, Pompey were¬† undergoing something of a revival,...

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Portsmouth’s Golden Opportunity

They left it, as we might have expected, until the very last minute, but yesterday afternoon at the High Court in London agreement was finally reached which sold Fratton Park, the home of Portsmouth Football Club, to the club’s supporters trust and with that comes something even more important. This means that the Trust can now complete its purchase of the club, meaning that Portsmouth will be fifty-one per cent owned by the Trust, the biggest club in English football to be owned under such a structure. This was, we hope, a day that will finally end the nightmare layered upon nightmare which has been the last three or four years of this club’s existence. Everything had been teed up for a nervy day. Over last few weeks or so, the saga concerning the club’s second spell in administration had continued to twist and turn in a bewildering fashion. The Supporters Trust had been granted preferred bidder status by the administrators, PKF, but the Trust’s bid was dependent upon the club being fully reunited with Fratton Park and the club’s former owner, Balram Chainrai, was putting a valuation upon it that was beyond the means of most, the Trust included. A further spanner was thrown into the works when Keith Harris, a former chairman of the Football League and one of the Red Knights (the high profile group which...

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Can We Really Trust the ‘Football Men’?

The Football Men. Those ‘fixers’ concerned with the buying and selling of football clubs. People who carry the sobriquet with some chutzpah and have a covert influence on the financial health of the game and in some cases the very existence of individual clubs. Are they really fit and proper people to be entrusted with the task they take upon themselves? Unregulated by the game’s ruling bodies, are they safe hands in which to place the future of the clubs which they sell to any interested party they can find? Exactly what are they ‘fixing’? Close examination of deals for the sale of clubs throws up a repetitive list of names. Financiers themselves, they are comfortable making big money deals and big money claims for the products they sell. They are accustomed to a high level of risk in their dealings, as their involvement in other ventures demonstrates. In their football dealings they take little or no risk with their own capital, being brokers of deals, although it is not unknown for them to take a percentage of the business they have brokered as payment for services rendered. Is this a bad thing for football? I suppose it depends on your perspective to a certain extent. If, like Sky, you see football as an exciting entertainment that is able to generate millions in a global market; if you believe...

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