Tag: Notts County

Panorama Has The Last Word On Notts County And Munto Finance

We have two pieces on last night’s edition of Panorama, which featured Notts County’s abortive take-over of 2009, today. Mark Murphy will be running his eyes over the show later, but first of all Ian King wonders what the whole debacle says about the state of the governance of English football. If ever there was a parable for the madness of modern football, perhaps the take-over of Notts County by Munto Finance during the summer of 2009 was definitive. Notts, the oldest professional football club in the world, had been in some difficulties for a while, and the Supporters Trust – who owned 60% of the share-holding in the club – were persuaded to hand over ownership to an organisation that claimed to have the backing of extraordinarily rich businessmen from the Middle East and who promised them the earth. For a few weeks, it looked as if they might just get away with it before the whole charade tumbled like a pack of cards and Notts County were left fighting off furious creditors. And last night, the BBC’s Panorama got around to telling the extraordinary story behind it. The BBC’s show was centred upon Russell King, a convicted fraudster claiming to have access to the vast riches of the Bahrainian royal family. King had found himself a route into the British bank, First London, and used a false guarantee...

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Living Colour: Ince as a Cult of Personality

In what appears to be incredibly bad timing, on the same week Professional Footballers Association Chief Executive Gordon Taylor called for the hiring of more minority managers in English football, League One club Notts County sacked one of the two with a job. Earlier in the week, Taylor marked Paul Ince as one to be fast-tracked for future Premiership managerial vacancies, and along with Chris Powell of Charlton, one who might benefit from institutionally-imposed pressure on clubs to interview and hire more black British managers. Then, the Ince-led Notts County continued a five match beaten streak in which no goals have been scored to begin its month of April. County now sit perilously close to relegation back to League Two. Regardless of skin colour, form like that threatens any gaffer with the sack. Having only previously managed at the League Two level with Macclesfield Town and the Franchise, Ince was thrust into the spotlight perhaps a touch too early when special dispensation was granted to allow him the managerial leap three divisions up to the Premiership in 2008. That experience in the top flight was rather short-lived, however, as after Blackburn endured a six match beaten streak by December, Rovers chair John Williams sacked Ince six months into the job. Ince climbed back down the ladder, this time settling in League One with the club he had led to promotion–the club formerly known as Wimbledon FC. One has to wonder if the fast-tracking of...

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FA Cup Match Of The Week 3: Notts County 1-1 Manchester City

To say that the relationship between Notts County and Nottingham Rugby Football Club has been transformed over the last eighteen months or so would be something of an understatement. In July 2009, having just acquired the club (to say that they bought the club would be misleading – the level of debt accumulated by Notts County under their ownership would seem to indicate that those behind Munto never paid for anything), they promptly evicted the rugby club from Meadow Lane until a court ordered that they had done so unlawfully. Munto are long gone from the club now, and in July of last year Meadow Lane PLC, the company that finally emerged from the chaos of their time running the club, also took the ownership of Nottingham RFC. It’s appropriate that this should be remembered on today of all days. Nottingham RFC still play at Meadow Lane, and their pitch markings are clearly visible today on a today that seems likely to send a shiver down the spine of Roberto Mancini. The rugby club’s use of Meadow Lane means that the pitch isn’t in the best of shape today. The contrast between this match and the Southampton vs Manchester United match is striking. Last night’s match was played on a Premier League pitch at a Premier League ground in all respects apart from the small detail of Southampton’s League...

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The Sordid Pleasure Of The Mass Brawl

Last night’s matches in the Football League were a carnival of goals, drama and excitement but (with the possible exception of Leeds United’s extraordinary implosion against Preston North End) the majority of us real event of the evening came at London Road, where the end of the match between Peterborough United and Notts County was “marred” by a massive fight between the players and staff of the two teams. The BBC took the time to edit down the events at the end of the match and even took the time to synchronise the commentary from BBC Radio Cambridgeshire for the occasion (the video is, for UK viewers, is available here, whilst those of you stopping by from elsewhere in the world can see some shaky cameraphone footage of it here). There are few other events that can occur during a football match that bring about more clichés in the media than a fight on the pitch. The brawls are always “mass” (which, considering that a brawl is dictionary defined as “a noisy quarrel or fight”, is hardly surprising, and they always “mar” the proceedings. Sometimes it will be described (usually as part of the post-match analysis by a former player) as “handbags (at dawn)”. No phrase that hasn’t been turned over a million times before will be deemed too lazy to file to demonstrate the disapproval of the writer...

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Match Of The Week: Aldershot Town 1-1 Notts County

Aldershot were the last Football League club to go bust during the season, and it is perhaps appropriate that Notts County, who have taken the concept of boom and bust to absurd new heights this season, should be their visitors five days before a winding up hearing at the High Court in London.

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