Tag: Motherwell

Video of the Day: Celtic vs Motherwell, November 1982

It isn’t only the English Premier League that is sending today, of course. Celtic have already Scottish league championship, and this afternoon the Scottish Premiership plays its final round of fixtures, with Celtic hosting Motherwell at Celtic Park. Five points behind fourth placed St Johnston and five points above sixth placed Ross County, Motherwell are to finish this season in fifth place in the league table, but this is an enormous thirty-three points behind the champions. This morning’s video comes from a slightly more difficult period in the club’s history. Under threat from a resurgent Aberdeen and Dundee United,...

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Going To The Well: A Unique Opportunity At Motherwell FC

Reformulated from an old African proverb, the saying “It takes a village to raise a child” speaks to the community effort required in providing a young person with the best chance of success. Coincidentally, football supporters in England and Scotland can identify with this sentiment. As television booms have busted with chairmen counting on money that never came, or financial schemes that failed to produce the desired results on the pitch and in the bank, fans from many walks of life have huddled together under their respective banners over the past decade to pick up the shattered pieces to raise clubs up again, the right way. This is currently being demonstrated by the new campaign to reunite fans for salvaging Plymouth Argyle, and perhaps the model for the success of endeavours such as Supporters Direct is on display at Liberty Stadium in Swansea. Once previously at the foot of league football for a spell, the Jacks and their Swansea City Supporters Trust–which controls nearly a 20% interest in the Welsh side–now find themselves in the same league as sheikhs from Abu Dhabi, a Russian billionaire, and American owners both reviled and accepted. So, naturally, it would fall to a club from the land of clans to add a new twist to this concept. This past week, news came that Motherwell FC’s departing chairperson John Boyle will be donating his shares–which...

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A Polaroid Moment in the Scottish Premier League

Photographs capture specific moments in time, with the more iconic ones representing certain splendors or symbolizing tumultuous events. The New York Times Square photo of an American sailor sealing victory with a kiss stands out as one of joy at the end of major hostilities following World War II. South Vietnamese General Nguyen Ngoc Loan firing his pistol and executing a Vietcong operative in close range of a photographer’s lens endures to remind us of just how close the horrors of war could be while still being thousands of miles away. Images of the mangled remains of Princess Diana’s limousine inform us on the tragic pitfalls of a modern public life and how quickly we lose something so dear. The same can be found in football. Bobby Moore sitting on the shoulders of his teammates as he lifts the 1966 World Cup trophy aloft in triumph has to be one of English football’s most iconic national images. US women’s player Brandi Chastain stripping to her sports bra and falling to her knees celebrating the winning penalty kick for the 1999 Women’s World Cup embodies the unexpected boldness that can be seen–as many discovered this summer–in today’s women’s game. John Terry’s tears in the rain upon missing his penalty in the 2008 UEFA Champions League Final suggest even tough guys can get a tad weepy. Either that, or it teaches us that...

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Motherwell vs Cardiff City: Venue – Hamilton Sheriffs Court

There was something about the loan transfer of Craig Bellamy from Manchester City to Cardiff City that was always going to cause a fuss. Cardiff’s financial travails have been well documented on this site before. Having already been hit with a Football League transfer embargo in December of last year, in March 2010, the club had a winding up order from HMRC issued against them with the taxman’s counsel, Matthew Smith, describing the club as being “plainly insolvent” – an analysis that was difficult to argue with. The petition was eventually seen off in May after a promise of investment of £6m by a Malaysian consortium led by the businessman Dato Chan Tien Ghee, but this didn’t prove to be the end of the club’s difficulties. The registrar, a Mrs Registrar Derrett, had said that Cardiff resembled “a company unable to pay its debts as they fall due”, but they were allowed a stay of execution in order to pay off their debts nevertheless. However, after delays in making the payment the transfer embargo was placed upon the club again, this time until the debt was confirmed as having been paid. Another date was set at court, although this time the club managed to pay their debt back. That said, however, the amount owed to HMRC was a drop in the ocean when compared to the club’s total debt,...

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