Tag: Leyton Orient

The Olympic Stadium’s Legacy Must Be As It Was Intended

The final submissions, then, are complete and now comes the waiting game. The tug of war over the Olympic Stadium has become one of the more unseemly events of the football season so far, a desperate battle for a piece of land that very few people involved in football had a great deal of interest until it became clear that there was a chance of building a vast, new stadium there on the (relatively) cheap. With an open letter issued by a group of former British Olympians stating that removing the track from the Olympic Stadium after the 2012 games would mean that the stadium would, “effectively become an Olympic Stadium with NO Olympic connection or legacy”, the question of whether Premier League football should be muscling in on what was supposed to be a legacy for British athletics is one that has finally become something of an issue over the last few days, and this is a question that should be at the forefront of the minds of those making the final decision over this issue. Tottenham Hotspur’s bid for the stadium seems to have little going for it other than that they will get a new stadium for £200m less than if they stay in N17 (which is questionable in itself) and the fact that they will be able to turn an operating profit from it. How...

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FA Cup Third Round Weekend 4: Norwich City 0-1 Leyton Orient

Josh Clarke supports Leyton Orient, but in his younger days was an apprentice with Norwich City. Sod’s Law meant that they would draw each other in the Third Round of the FA Cup, which meant an unexpected trip back to Norfolk for him. In what is normally the most romantic weekend of the English football calender, a week of deep introspection and soul-searching has left me unable to bask in the potential banana-skins, giant killings and Ronnie Radford moments that the FA Cup 3rd Round is capable of throwing up. The reason for my anxiety is that the cruel mistress that is the FA Cup draw, shoddily overseen by Noel Gallagher and Serge from Kasabian has slung together my two clubs. I’ve found out what happens when your home team, the team you know and love, comes head-to-head with your newly adopted local side. Indeed, it’s hardly a game to capture the imagination of the countries sporting press, but when Leyton Orient take the trip up the A47 to meet Norwich City, my usually unwavering loyalty may have an uncharacteristic wandering eye. Having represented the Canaries from a young age and becoming an apprentice for the club in my teens, I have a long personal history with the club from Norfolk. And for that reason, I should be supporting Norwich. I will be supporting Norwich. Yet the step taken...

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Ralph Coates: 1946-2010 – A Burnley, Tottenham And Orient Legend

It is surprisingly uncommon to find a player whose passing will be marked equally between two different clubs, but the death of Ralph Coates at the age of sixty-four will be marked with sadness at all three of the Football League clubs at which he played: Burnley, Tottenham Hotspur and Leyton Orient. Coates joined Burnley in 1961 as an apprentice, turned professional with them and made his debut for them in 1964. He was, at his first club, slightly unfortunate with his age. The early 1960s were a period of great success for Burnley, but Coates’ emergence into the first team at Turf Moor coincided with a slight dip in their fortunes. Even so, Coates was an uncommonly elegant player on the mud-bath pitches of 1960s England and he made four appearances for his country as well as being in the initial squad for the 1970 World Cup finals, although he didn’t make Alf Ramsey’s final cut. He left the club in 1971 after they Burnley were relegated from the First Division, and Tottenham Hotspur were prepared to pay £190,000 for his services. Coates’ career at Spurs began with a flourish. In 1972, Spurs won the UEFA Cup and the following year Coates was the hero, scoring the winning goal at Wembley against Norwich City. This, however, had been the last hurrah for the great Spurs side of the...

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Match Of The Midweek: Droylsden 1-1 Leyton Orient

For the intrepid visitor from East London to Droylsden this evening, that shiver running down the spine might not be entirely down to the bitter cold in the air tonight. The home side are, after all nicknamed “The Bloods” and the venue for this evening’s Second Round match in the FA Cup is The Butchers Arms, all of which rather calls to mind the opening scenes from “An American Werewolf In London”. Compared to the giants of the the area, Manchester United and the recently-minted Manchester City, they remain very much in the shadows, and the reality of their position is that their real competitors are the other Tameside clubs – the likes of Hyde FC, Stalybridge Celtic and Ashton United – rather than the impenetrable two of the Greater Manchester area. It’s a crowded part of the world, and a little extra publicity will do them good. Also, in the cold, hard reality of non-league football, the money from this run in the competition will come in useful and, much as we might like occasionally indulge ourselves in “The Romance Of The FA Cup” (© The FA), this counts for a lot for a Blue Square North side with an average home crowd of 400 people. Leyton Orient, meanwhile, have had a curious start to the new season. They started poorly, but have seen their form pick up...

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Barry Hearn On Administration

Michel Platini, with all of the elegance that one might expect from a man with such a playing career, describes it as “financial doping”. It is, in short, the accumulation of debt to purchase success on the pitch. Some clubs do it as a result of the egos of their chairmen, some do it from the fear of what might happen if they don’t, and some do it in the genuine but misguided belief that somehow everything will be okay if they manage to get the team winning on the pitch. The result, however, is usually the same. The players and the manager leave when things turn sour, there is a desperate rush for new investors and, when these can’t be found, it ends in either administration or a close shave with administration. All of which brings us to the somewhat divisive subject of Barry Hearn. In a recent interview with Talksport, Hearn described clubs that enter into adminstration as “cheats” and stated his belief that all clubs that enter into adminstration should be relegated two divisions. There are plenty of reasons to be cynical of Hearn’s pronouncements on the subject of how to run a football club. Bit by bit, Hearn has sold off areas of the site of Leyton Orient’s Brisbane Road ground (which some people, presumably including Hearn, call “The Matchroom Stadium”), and Orient will be...

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