Tag: Leyton Orient

There Are No Prizes: The 200% End Of 2013 Awards

It’s the time of year when handing out awards for things that have happened to people and organisations over the previous twelve months or so comes into vogue, and even though the football season somewhat inconveniently doesn’t pay too much attention to the machinations of the Gregorian calendar, we’re going to give it a go anyway. (For those of you that are interested in such things, my review of 2013 can be found here – it was written a couple of weeks ago, but I don’t think that an enormous amount has changed since then, apart from Manchester United starting to win matches) But anyway, I’m usually pretty uncomfortable in a tuxedo and tie, all the more so when I’m dressed like this in a room on my own with my cat staring at me as if I’m on the precipice of a nervous breakdown, so… on with the show! Team Of The Year: Leyton Orient – To build a winning team is one thing. To build a winning team on a shoestring budget is another. To transform a team that looked likely to struggle against relegation into challengers for promotion is a mighty achievement indeed. At the end of October last year, Leyton Orient FC was in twentieth place in League One, just one spot above the relegation places in that division, but just six defeats in the...

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Back To The Eighties: 1980/81, Part Twelve – The Kings Of Orient Are

Five days before Christmas 1980, Chelsea were chasing promotion back to the First Division. The leaders, West Ham United, were already sailing off into the distance at the top of the table, but that still left two automatic promotion places to play for – no play-offs in those days, of course – and Chelsea went into their last match before the Christmas rush in third place in the Second Division table, although their advantage was a slender one, with five points separating them from twelfth placed Orient – no “Leyton” prefix for them in those days, either – whose visit to Stamford Bridge was consider worthy of a visit from the cameras of Match Of The Day. Meanwhile, we also have very brief highlights – one goal per match – from two First Division matches played that weekend, as Manchester City played Leeds United at Maine Road and Brighton & Hove Albion took on championship chasing Aston Villa at The Goldstone Ground. You can follow Twohundredpercent on Twitter by clicking...

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A Change Of Name May Be The Least Important Aspect Of Leyton Orients Future.

As the feelgood factor engendered by the actual games themselves starts to recede to being just a memory, the question of the future of the Olympic Stadium in Stratford is starting to rear its ugly head again. Its acquisition by West Ham United seems to be, for better or for worse, a done deal with the next stage in that process now being the thorny issue of how the conversion of the stadium from an athletics stadium will be funded, with yet another row now brewing with the owner of Leyton Orient, Barry Hearn. Hearn has claimed, through Orients official website, that handing the Olympic Stadium to West Ham alone would amount to subsidising the club’s £90 million debt. West Ham have countered by stating that, “West Ham United have strict obligations of confidentiality under agreements, relating to the Olympic Stadium concessionaire tender process, which we continue to respect” and that “we are frustrated that we cannot counter some of the recent inaccuracies reported about our bid in the media.” Hearns viewpoints on the Olympic Stadium over the last three or four years or so have shifted and changed with the seasons. After initially stating disinterest in it, he then loudly protested at the bidding war between West Ham United and Tottenham Hotspur because of the potential damage that could be done to his club from having a Premier League...

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In Support Of Leyton Orient And Safe Standing

We have a quick word this evening for the Football Supporters Federation and two petitions that they have organised for campaigns that they are supporting. First up is safe standing at football matches. Since the Hillsborough disaster in 1989 and the subsequent Taylor Report, terracing at football grounds has been largely phased out. The Taylor Report, however, didn’t state that terracing was intrinsically unsafe and it could even be argued that it has been used by bigger clubs to artificially inflate ticket prices. Safe standing works perfectly well in Germany, a model of how to run the game in so many ways, and there is nothing inherently unsafe about terracing. With this in mind, Don Foster, the MP for Bath and Co-Chair of the Liberal Democrat Parliamentary Policy Committee on Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport has launched a Safe Standing Bill that is due for its second parliamentary reading in June. The Premier League is against it and the government appears at best lukewarm on the subject, but what slight chance that we might have of changing their minds might come if we, as supporters, can express our support for the bill. The FSF has, therefore, started a petition that you can sign if you agree that we, as supporters, should be given the choice of whether we sit or stand at matches, no matter what league they are...

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Imperfect, Impractical And Immoral, The Olympic Stadium Fiasco Holds A Mirror Up To The True Values Of British Sport

If, as seems likely, the decision to grant the post-2012 use of the Olympic Stadium in Stratford to West Ham United is rubber-stamped over the next few weeks, we should perhaps pause for a moment to consider what the decision says about the state of English sport at the start of the new century. For the last few weeks, we have seen an unseemly attempt at a land grab between two large sporting organisations who both seemed to cherish one thing above all else – a site in East London with outstanding transport links, a relative rarity in London, that was available on the cheap. Money, as ever, trumped all other concerns. The Olympic legacy, a central part of the reason why the games are being held in London in the first place, were put firmly on the back burner and the future of the football club nearest to Stratford feels a little less certain today after the parachuting in of one of the game’s behemoths, but very few people seem to care very much about that. In thrall to the twin false gods of Mammon and the Premier League, the timbre of the debate on the subject had a thoroughly modern feel to it, yet both the Spurs and West Ham bids had the feel of being thoroughly imperfect for completely different reasons. The one aspect of the...

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