Tag: Leeds United

Cafe Calcio On Twohundredpercent: Football Impressionism And The Psychology Of Wimbledon

Cafe Calcio is back on London’s Resonance FM this evening at nine o’clock, and you can join Chris Dixon, David Stubbs and Chris Roberts live this evening by clicking here. Alternatively, should you wish to catch the repeat of it, this will be on tomorrow (Saturday) morning at eleven o’clock. Should you be unable to make either of these dates, you can catch up with the podcast version of their show (as well as their archive of other shows) by clicking here. This week, Chris Roberts has been tackling football and impression, and the psychology of “The Crazy Gang”. Football Art Masterclass: Impressionism Impressionism was a French 19th century art movement which marked a momentous break from tradition in European painting. The Impressionists incorporated new scientific research into physics to achieve a more exact representation of colour and tone. The sudden change in the look of these paintings was brought about by a shift in methodology as well, such techniques as applying paint in small touches of pure colour rather than broader strokes or painting out of doors to catch a particular fleeting impression of colour and light. The upshot emphasised the artist’s perception of the subject matter as much as the subject itself. The idea is that  the artist captures the image of an object as someone would see it if they just caught a glimpse of it. Pissaro and Sisley painted the...

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91 Years Of Football Through 7 Players: From Leeds United, 1920 to West Ham, 2011

An article on the front page of the When Saturday Comes website bemoaned the airbrushing from history of anything from before the beginning of the Premier League, but the time-line of football is considerably more textured than this. With this is mind (and from a post on the WSC forum, which is probably the best place on the internet to discuss football), here is a rambling six degrees of speculation. From Leeds United’s first season in the Football League to West Ham United vs Blackpool in the Premier League on the 2nd February 2011 in seven players. Feel free to have a go at this in the comments and knock mine into a proverbial cocked hat. Centre-half Ernie Hart joined Leeds United in September 1920, a year after they were formed. He was a regular in that team – he left Leeds in 1936 – alongside… …Jack Milburn (cousin of Jackie), who signed for Leeds in November 1928. Jack was in the Leeds team until the outbreak of war in 1939, and in January 1938 Leeds signed the sixteen year-old winger… …David Cochrane, who went straight into the first team and became a regular himself. David’s career was interrupted by the war, but he re-signed for Leeds after it and, in April 1949, he played alongside… …John Charles, who played for Leeds for nine years, before going to Juventus...

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FA Cup Third Round Weekend 1: Arsenal 1-1 Leeds United

No-one is hit harder by the unremittingly harsh light of football’s inherent meritocracy than the supporters of a “Big Club” that falls upon hard times. When they slipped to the third tier of English football during the late 1990s, Manchester City supporters came up with a song that expressed their existential angst called, “We’re Not Really Here”, a singular act of defiance at the plight of their club that bordered upon minimalist genius. “What has become of us?”, is the subconscious question that is constantly running through the mind of the supporter that didn’t sign up with their clubs for trips to slowly decaying League One grounds and early-round humiliations in the FA Cup. All of which brings neatly on to the subject of Leeds United, of course. There must have been many points over the last four or five years at which the years of the Don Revie dynasty or of the Cantona-inspired, out of the blue league championship must have felt like, if not a dream, then an out of body experience. The supporters of Leeds United have tasted what they have interpreted as hell, but if there are steps to be made on the return journey from perdition, this afternoon’s performance against Arsenal may just reached the point at which, after seven years away, their club took on the feel of a Premier League club. Leeds...

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2010: A Football Financial Review

You could frame it. If you wanted a short, pithy representation of all that has been wrong with football finance in 2010, you could do no better than quote a Plymouth Argyle fan known as “Sensible Surfer” on the BBC Football website over the Christmas period. “Ridsdale set to take control… good news,” he/she said, a phrase which would sit nicely as an explanation of irony…except that it didn’t appear to BE irony. And it served as fair comment on Argyle’s current state that, relatively, Peter Ridsdale – the failed former Leeds and Cardiff chairman and serial over-borrower – IS good news for the cash and panic-stricken South Westerners, with the heaviest possible emphasis on the word ‘relatively.’ If professional football entered 2010 in a state of moral and financial bankruptcy, it is leaving it in much the same manner. Certain football problems have been “solved.” Some more have emerged. While others, hello Portsmouth, look set to run forever. The “greater fool” theory still underpins much of the game’s financial strategies. The theory is about as scientific as it sounds – buying something in the belief that you will be able to sell it again for a higher price (to a “greater fool”), regardless of what has happened in the meantime (increased debts, usually), or even whether the original price was rooted in reality. Finding a “greater fool” is...

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Ken Bates: Master Of PR & All He Surveys

I should be on my knees every day, thanking my God that my only experience of Kenneth William Bates, chairman but not owner – oh no – of Leeds United, was brief and indirect. And it summed him up too. In the 1990s, Chelsea’s reserves in the old Football Combination played their “home” games at my team Kingstonian’s ground. As part of the deal, Chelsea played an annual pre-season friendly against the Ks. And they treated it as a proper first team occasion. Matthew Harding once drank the bar dry. An ineffectual Gianluca Vialli was once substituted after an hour,and Pierluigi Casiraghi limped off injured shortly before half-time in his one appearance. Bates turned up once, revelling in his two favourite scenarios. He was the centre of attention, the press photo pack focusing on him rather than Kevin Hitchcock for some strange reason. And he was conning people. A tabloid newspaper was involved in some Chelsea-related sponsorship. And Bates was in his seat, proudly reading his copy… or at least looking at the pictures. But, of course, he wasn’t reading the paper at all. Tucked inside the paper was another publication entirely, the magazine he was actually reading. He was fooling them all and he was loving it. But Bates wasn’t making any point to anyone else, at least anyone else important in his scheme of things. The only...

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