Tag: Leeds United

Football’s Values: Unethical, Dishonourable or Ill-Advised?

Currently appearing in the high court are an ex-Pompey director, past owner and recent manager on various charges of tax-evasion. Charged with fraud and unfair trading practices at  court an ex-Cardiff City director and Plymouth chairman, whilst at Wrexham a consortium containing a solicitor debarred on eighteen counts attempts a take over. That’s just so far this month. Not to mention the shenanigans at Port Vale and Plymouth reported by m’colleagues elsewhere on this site. The values demonstrated by the West Ham trio of Gold, Sullivan and Brady with their ‘tactful and understanding’ management style also made interesting reading this week. One comment on Phil McNulty’s blog after the insensitive manner of the sacking of Avram Grant by this conglomerate shows the esteem in which they are held. It suggests that Sullivan’s ‘abuse of the players … is typical and it won’t be long before he gets stuck into the fans who, in his mind, never appreciate his largesse and mastery of the football business.’ I gather fans at Birmingham (what IS going on there?) nurture the same level of affection for their ex-owners. That the largesse so described is derived from the porn industry is a matter often used to deride any team they are involved with and often seems more of a joke than a moral issue. Meanwhile at Pompey in recent times we have had...

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Bates’ Caterwauling Doesn’t Disguise Questions That Should Be Answered

At least Ken Bates now knows who owns the club he’s chaired for the last half-decade, as he’ll have written their name on the cheque for the “undisclosed sum” which has bought him majority ownership of Leeds United. Unless, of course, he’s just put a blank cheque in an envelope, addressed it to “Leeds United’s beneficial owners, Cayman Islands, West Indies” and trusted that the local postie is better informed about the club’s owners than, well, the club themselves, apparently. There’s some sort of irony in the news of Bates’ “purchase” of 73% of Leeds coming out just as Leeds themselves all but came out of promotion play-off contention in this year’s championship. The greatest pressure exerted on Leeds United to become transparent about their ownership appeared to be that applied by Premier League chief Richard Scudamore’s threat to apply ownership transparency regulations to individuals, should Leeds have won promotion via this season’s play-offs. The “deal” for Bates’ company Outro – registered in the West Indies, oh surprise me do – was done on April 26th, at which point the Whites could still have pipped Nottingham Forest for sixth place. By the time Bates’ accession to the Leeds throne was in the public domain, Forest were all-but-mathematically sixth. And not even QPR suffering a 15-point deduction (to take a figure purely at random, as happened to Leeds themselves after...

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Match of the Week: Leeds United 4-1 Nottingham Forest

It feels a bit blasphemous reporting on a match in which a club associated with Ken Bates performed well, but since he’s one of football’s greatest chairmen, a good scrub in the shower should eliminate some of the guilt. Certainly, the Championship fixture between Leeds United and Nottingham Forest weighed heavily upon those at Elland Road on Saturday–both in terms of history and contemporary significance. While managers Simon Grayson and Billy Davies walked down those halls, through those doors, and onto that pitch, the ghosts of Revie and Clough floated along in their wake, anxious to see how today’s squads would rise in a match of near eternal foes. With promotion playoff potential at stake for both clubs, passions indeed ran high on the field of battle but in the end, quality won the day. The opening fifteen minutes were a flurry of  fits and starts as each side wanted to be the first off the mark. Indeed, it was difficult to devise a strategy for either club during this time, although Forest’s initial attack seemed geared toward flooding the Leeds half with as many bodies as possible and forcing them to concede set pieces. Shots by defenders Chambers and Lynch from the channel carved out on the right side were dealt with while Leeds attempted swift counter attacks via Aston Villa loanee Barry Bannan as Forest’s defenders were...

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Celebrating Football’s Greatest Chairman

With the recent protests against the government so far peaking with half a million protestors marching with the TUC to Hyde Park last Saturday, we have decided here at twohundredpercent that we will spend April looking at some of the figures within football who have sought to smash the system over the years. Later in the month Gavin will express his admiration for Trade Union Shop Steward turned Premiership manager Sir Alex Ferguson, and Ian will profile the iconic commentator Alan Green. First of all, Rob Freeman will sing the praises of the one chairman to challenge the establishment more than any other, in some respects the anarchist’s chairman – Ken Bates. Kenneth William Bates was born in West London, and celebrates his eightieth birthday later in the year. Ealing-raised in the humble surroundings of a council flat, Bates grew up as a supporter of his local club – Queens Park Rangers – and like most young fans harboured hopes of playing the game full time, but as with the majority of youngsters in love with the game, a playing career never materialised. Not to be put off from entering the ranks of football through the playing side, Bates set his sights on entering the game another way – through the boardroom. Bates’ earliest years as director and chairmen in the 1970s at Oldham Athletic and Wigan Athletic were...

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Cafe Calcio On Twohundredpercent: Football Impressionism And The Psychology Of Wimbledon

Cafe Calcio is back on London’s Resonance FM this evening at nine o’clock, and you can join Chris Dixon, David Stubbs and Chris Roberts live this evening by clicking here. Alternatively, should you wish to catch the repeat of it, this will be on tomorrow (Saturday) morning at eleven o’clock. Should you be unable to make either of these dates, you can catch up with the podcast version of their show (as well as their archive of other shows) by clicking here. This week, Chris Roberts has been tackling football and impression, and the psychology of “The Crazy Gang”. Football Art Masterclass: Impressionism Impressionism was a French 19th century art movement which marked a momentous break from tradition in European painting. The Impressionists incorporated new scientific research into physics to achieve a more exact representation of colour and tone. The sudden change in the look of these paintings was brought about by a shift in methodology as well, such techniques as applying paint in small touches of pure colour rather than broader strokes or painting out of doors to catch a particular fleeting impression of colour and light. The upshot emphasised the artist’s perception of the subject matter as much as the subject itself. The idea is that  the artist captures the image of an object as someone would see it if they just caught a glimpse of it. Pissaro and Sisley painted the...

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