Tag: Leeds United

Match of the Week: Leeds United 4-1 Nottingham Forest

It feels a bit blasphemous reporting on a match in which a club associated with Ken Bates performed well, but since he’s one of football’s greatest chairmen, a good scrub in the shower should eliminate some of the guilt. Certainly, the Championship fixture between Leeds United and Nottingham Forest weighed heavily upon those at Elland Road on Saturday–both in terms of history and contemporary significance. While managers Simon Grayson and Billy Davies walked down those halls, through those doors, and onto that pitch, the ghosts of Revie and Clough floated along in their wake, anxious to see how today’s squads would rise in a match of near eternal foes. With promotion playoff potential at stake for both clubs, passions indeed ran high on the field of battle but in the end, quality won the day. The opening fifteen minutes were a flurry of  fits and starts as each side wanted to be the first off the mark. Indeed, it was difficult to devise a strategy for either club during this time, although Forest’s initial attack seemed geared toward flooding the Leeds half with as many bodies as possible and forcing them to concede set pieces. Shots by defenders Chambers and Lynch from the channel carved out on the right side were dealt with while Leeds attempted swift counter attacks via Aston Villa loanee Barry Bannan as Forest’s defenders were...

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Celebrating Football’s Greatest Chairman

With the recent protests against the government so far peaking with half a million protestors marching with the TUC to Hyde Park last Saturday, we have decided here at twohundredpercent that we will spend April looking at some of the figures within football who have sought to smash the system over the years. Later in the month Gavin will express his admiration for Trade Union Shop Steward turned Premiership manager Sir Alex Ferguson, and Ian will profile the iconic commentator Alan Green. First of all, Rob Freeman will sing the praises of the one chairman to challenge the establishment more than any other, in some respects the anarchist’s chairman – Ken Bates. Kenneth William Bates was born in West London, and celebrates his eightieth birthday later in the year. Ealing-raised in the humble surroundings of a council flat, Bates grew up as a supporter of his local club – Queens Park Rangers – and like most young fans harboured hopes of playing the game full time, but as with the majority of youngsters in love with the game, a playing career never materialised. Not to be put off from entering the ranks of football through the playing side, Bates set his sights on entering the game another way – through the boardroom. Bates’ earliest years as director and chairmen in the 1970s at Oldham Athletic and Wigan Athletic were...

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Cafe Calcio On Twohundredpercent: Football Impressionism And The Psychology Of Wimbledon

Cafe Calcio is back on London’s Resonance FM this evening at nine o’clock, and you can join Chris Dixon, David Stubbs and Chris Roberts live this evening by clicking here. Alternatively, should you wish to catch the repeat of it, this will be on tomorrow (Saturday) morning at eleven o’clock. Should you be unable to make either of these dates, you can catch up with the podcast version of their show (as well as their archive of other shows) by clicking here. This week, Chris Roberts has been tackling football and impression, and the psychology of “The Crazy Gang”. Football Art Masterclass: Impressionism Impressionism was a French 19th century art movement which marked a momentous break from tradition in European painting. The Impressionists incorporated new scientific research into physics to achieve a more exact representation of colour and tone. The sudden change in the look of these paintings was brought about by a shift in methodology as well, such techniques as applying paint in small touches of pure colour rather than broader strokes or painting out of doors to catch a particular fleeting impression of colour and light. The upshot emphasised the artist’s perception of the subject matter as much as the subject itself. The idea is that  the artist captures the image of an object as someone would see it if they just caught a glimpse of it. Pissaro and Sisley painted the...

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91 Years Of Football Through 7 Players: From Leeds United, 1920 to West Ham, 2011

An article on the front page of the When Saturday Comes website bemoaned the airbrushing from history of anything from before the beginning of the Premier League, but the time-line of football is considerably more textured than this. With this is mind (and from a post on the WSC forum, which is probably the best place on the internet to discuss football), here is a rambling six degrees of speculation. From Leeds United’s first season in the Football League to West Ham United vs Blackpool in the Premier League on the 2nd February 2011 in seven players. Feel free to have a go at this in the comments and knock mine into a proverbial cocked hat. Centre-half Ernie Hart joined Leeds United in September 1920, a year after they were formed. He was a regular in that team – he left Leeds in 1936 – alongside… …Jack Milburn (cousin of Jackie), who signed for Leeds in November 1928. Jack was in the Leeds team until the outbreak of war in 1939, and in January 1938 Leeds signed the sixteen year-old winger… …David Cochrane, who went straight into the first team and became a regular himself. David’s career was interrupted by the war, but he re-signed for Leeds after it and, in April 1949, he played alongside… …John Charles, who played for Leeds for nine years, before going to Juventus...

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FA Cup Third Round Weekend 1: Arsenal 1-1 Leeds United

No-one is hit harder by the unremittingly harsh light of football’s inherent meritocracy than the supporters of a “Big Club” that falls upon hard times. When they slipped to the third tier of English football during the late 1990s, Manchester City supporters came up with a song that expressed their existential angst called, “We’re Not Really Here”, a singular act of defiance at the plight of their club that bordered upon minimalist genius. “What has become of us?”, is the subconscious question that is constantly running through the mind of the supporter that didn’t sign up with their clubs for trips to slowly decaying League One grounds and early-round humiliations in the FA Cup. All of which brings neatly on to the subject of Leeds United, of course. There must have been many points over the last four or five years at which the years of the Don Revie dynasty or of the Cantona-inspired, out of the blue league championship must have felt like, if not a dream, then an out of body experience. The supporters of Leeds United have tasted what they have interpreted as hell, but if there are steps to be made on the return journey from perdition, this afternoon’s performance against Arsenal may just reached the point at which, after seven years away, their club took on the feel of a Premier League club. Leeds...

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