Tag: Kingstonian

Match Of The Week 2: Tooting & Mitcham United 1-4 Kingstonian

It never really got going properly this year anyway, but the end of August marks the beginning of the passing of summer into autumn, and this Bank Holiday weekend brings an extra round of non-league matches. In the Ryman League a round of derby matches has been scheduled for a day when there are no Premier League or Football League matches being played. In the Premier Division, we’re at The Imperial Fields for the match between Tooting & Mitcham United and Kingstonian. This is a match which perhaps encapsulates this league in a way that no two other clubs could. Tooting have been members of  this league since 1956, whilst Kingstonian – a short sojourn in the Football Conference aside – have been here since 1929. Both are clubs which departed old homes for something new and have had difficulties since then. On the pitch, Tooting have had the better start of the two clubs, with two wins out of three in the league (against Concord Rangers and Leatherhead), whilst Kingstonian, who started the season amongst the clubs expected to at least challenge for a place in the play-offs, are still awaiting their first win of the season. It turns out to be an afternoon which turns this early season on its form, though. It would, however, be remiss of us to not mention Imperial Fields itself. Tooting &...

Read More

Those We Have Lost: Richmond Road, Kingstonian FC

After a depressing few days, let’s try and lighten the mood a little as Mark Murphy brings us his memories of the former home of Kingstonian FC at Richmond Road. I only saw the death throes of Isthmian League Kingstonian’s Richmond Road ground. But it still had ‘something.’ And (sorry if this is “too much information”) most of my dreams involving Kingstonian games are still at Richmond Road, despite it hosting its last fixtures in January 1988. Richmond Road had housed Kingstonian (Ks) since the club took on the name – and the mantle of “town club” – in 1919. Before the “great” war, there was a “Kingston-on-Thames FC” there. This club emerged from the primordial swamp of clubs which characterised organised football’s development in the town at the turn of the last century. And in 1907… it split again. Kingston-on-Thames continued at Richmond Road and the “new” club, Old Kingstonians (“Old” being the 1900s equivalent of “AFC”), played at Norbiton Sports Ground, on which now stands Kingsmeadow Stadium, where Ks now play and to where Wimbledon will bring league football in August. With war dissipating old enmities, “Kingstonian” was formed in 1919 and although the Norbiton Sports Ground was available for £2,225 in April of that year, the £2,225 was not available; a lot of money in those days etc… Richmond Road, which had done wartime service as...

Read More

Missing Leatherhead Away: The Moral Dilemma Of Not Going To Matches

“Rites of passage” tend to involve teenagers and revolve around love and/or sex, certainly in the Hollywood films that I know about. Being a non-league football fan, I missed that particular rite of passage completely, along with pretty much every other interesting rite of passage you could think of. I mean no disrespect the former Isthmian League club, but nothing remotely life-changing was ever going to happen to me at Wokingham Town on a cold Tuesday night in November. To trainspotters, maybe, as the ground was famously bordered by two separate railway routes and tracks. By the very fact that I considered such railway geography to be “famous” meant I was never going to appear in a real-life remake of “American Graffiti.” Something changed recently, though. More and more often in recent years, the prospect of a “Wokingham-Town-on-a-cold-Tuesday-night” trip has failed to be an enticing one. But when the conversation about the logistical problems or desirability of getting to the game turns to the concept of “well, you could always not go,” we just laugh. Faced with that concept one recent morning, for the first time ever, I thought of the fixture to which I could travel and screamed out loud, as I was walking along the pavement: “sod it, I’m not going,” – which got a funny look from the postman, I can assure you. Like all too...

Read More

Video Of The Week: Non-League Special

We’re returning this week to a theme that we touched on a couple of weeks ago, with highlights from some of the matches played in the non-league game over the last few days. We kick off with a top of the table local derby from the Ryman League Premier Division that was played last Tuesday night between Sutton United and Kingstonian. A crowd of not far short of 800 (a remarkable statistic, if we stop and consider that this is being played in effectively the regional seventh division of English football) turned out for this match, with Sutton three points clear at the top of the table and with a chance to extend their lead. Our second match sees us stay in Surrey, for Saturday’s match from the Blue Square South between Woking and Chelmsford City. Both of these teams have had curious seasons so far. Woking could be forgiven for being distracted by their forthcoming FA Cup match against Brighton & Hove Albion on Tuesday night, with a match against FC United of Manchester being the reward for the winners of that match. For all of their success in the FA Cup this season, however, Woking have stalled in the league so far and sit in a lower mid-table position at present. Chelmsford City are already in the Second Round of the competition and will travel to Wycombe...

Read More

Something Personal About Colin Lippiatt

We didn’t quite realise just how much of an event it was until we arrived at the ground itself. St Albans City had finished in second place in the 2005/06 Blue Square South table behind big-spending Weymouth, but the team had hardly set the local populace alight (the average home crowd for that season remained less than 600 and the club didn’t record a home crowd of over 1,000 people for the whole of the season). The possibility of promotion to the Blue Square Premier, the highest level of football that the club had played at since its formation in 1908, seemed to be an acquired taste for local people and it still felt a long way away, even on the day of the play-off final itself. The opposition, Histon, were a village team from near Cambridge. We even wondered aloud on the way to Stevenage for the match whether the crowd for it would attract many more than 1,000 people. Colin Lippiatt’s team deserved better than this. They might have ended the league season as runners-up to Weymouth, but they ran them close, eventually effectively ceding defeat in the championship race only after a narrow 3-2 defeat at The Wessex Stadium with just a couple of league matches of the season left to play. That the team should be anywhere near the top of the table in the...

Read More