Tag: Hull City

Divide, Conquer & Scare: Hull City’s War Of Attrition Continues

If the growing feud between Assem Allam and the supporters of Hull City AFC is to be viewed through the prism of being a battle for hearts and minds in some way, then today probably hasn’t been a very good day for Allam. The story appeared in the Hull Daily Mail newspaper and the headline was the obvious one: “Hull City season tickets could go up by 50 per cent if Tigers rebrand rejected.” This is, of course, a ridiculous and offensive idea and for several different reasons. But this also has the feeling of having something of the diversion about it. Previously in this soap opera, he has threatened to sell the club and plumbed frankly extraordinary depths in breaking with any sense of common decency in saying that, of those opposed to his plans, that, “They can die as soon as they want,” a statement so grotesque that it makes one wonder over his mental well-being. What sort of person, we might reasonably ask, would even think that, let alone say it publicly? The accusations of blackmail are an obvious reflex reaction to it all, of course, though who exactly Allam would be looking to blackmail isn’t necessary an easy question to answer. If the FA are as blasé about ticket prices as most people seem to think they are these days, why they should they give...

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The Petulant Outbursts Of Assem Allam

There’s nothing like a bit of blackmail to liven up English football in a quiet news week (and, alas, FA Cup third round replay week is such a week). Good job, then, that Hull CITY owner Assem Allam isn’t resorting to blackmail in order to force English football’s governing body (the Football Association, in case you didn’t recognise them from the description) to accept his thoroughly-researched, precisely-budgeted rebranding of his club to Hull Tigers. Allam met the FA recently. His “promise to go away within 24 hours” if either the Hull “community” or the FA reject the rebrand suggests that meeting didn’t go according to his plan. The “antics” of the more high-profile egomaniacal football club owners constantly put me in mind of Woody Allen’s 1971 film Bananas (one of his early funny ones), where the newly-installed revolutionary leader of the fictional republic of San Marcos announces his reform plans, including the requirement for “all citizens to change their underwear every half-hour. Underwear will be worn on the outside so we can check.” Allam’s theory, purloined from the Harvard Business Review (so it must be true), is that companies with shorter names perform better when floated on the stock market. Hull Tigers isn’t “shorter” than Hull CITY of course. But Allam told the Guardian newspaper’s David Conn that “everybody knows it now as Hull City Tigers”; which was news...

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There Are No Prizes: The 200% End Of 2013 Awards

It’s the time of year when handing out awards for things that have happened to people and organisations over the previous twelve months or so comes into vogue, and even though the football season somewhat inconveniently doesn’t pay too much attention to the machinations of the Gregorian calendar, we’re going to give it a go anyway. (For those of you that are interested in such things, my review of 2013 can be found here – it was written a couple of weeks ago, but I don’t think that an enormous amount has changed since then, apart from Manchester United starting to win matches) But anyway, I’m usually pretty uncomfortable in a tuxedo and tie, all the more so when I’m dressed like this in a room on my own with my cat staring at me as if I’m on the precipice of a nervous breakdown, so… on with the show! Team Of The Year: Leyton Orient – To build a winning team is one thing. To build a winning team on a shoestring budget is another. To transform a team that looked likely to struggle against relegation into challengers for promotion is a mighty achievement indeed. At the end of October last year, Leyton Orient FC was in twentieth place in League One, just one spot above the relegation places in that division, but just six defeats in the...

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On Coventry City, Cardiff City & Hull City’s Winter Of Discontent

There are three football clubs at which the Christmas period may well prove to be a period of reflection. The circumstances that have engulfed these three clubs over the last few weeks and months have come to act as something of a barometer for the state of professional football in this country at the moment. None of them are sufficiently insignificant as clubs to be easy to sweep under the carpet – two of them, for goodness’ sake, are in the Premier League – and the behaviour of their owners have heaped shame on what used to be a game, as well as causing thousands to start reconsidering whether this “game” is even worth bothering with any more. It used to occasionally be said that, over the course of your lifetime, you were statistically less likely to change your bank than you were to change your husband and wife. I’m not entirely sure whether this situation is still the same but I’d say with a degree of certainty that, even in the footloose and fancy-free twenty-century, when we’re all encouraged to treat every interaction in our personal lives as consumers, that we’re still less likely to change our football team over the course of our lifetimes than just about any other aspect of our lives. It’s only through this prism of attachment and self-identification can the decisions of those...

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Hull City’s Assem Allam Is A Symptom Of A Broader Problem

There’s an attempt at a coup d’etat going on in football in this country at the moment, and it feels as if point is rapidly approaching at which supporters of all hues will draw a line in the sand and say “enough.” Indeed, that point may already have been reached this week with the confirmation that, having originally promised that there would be a period of consultation with supporters and then apparently going back on this by stating that protestors “can die as soon as they want”, Dr Assem Allam’s Hull City has submitted a formal proposal to the Football Association to change the club’s name to “Hull Tigers” from the start of next season. Allam’s overwhelming desire to desecrate Hull City AFC has publicly been reported as being related to a belief that the use of the name “City” is “common” – he might have preferred to use the word “commonplace” there lest his words be left open to misinterpretation, but that’s by the by – but it has also been reported that this move may be due to something a little more prosaic, that being the local city council’s refusal to sell him The KC Stadium and land surrounding it. To be clear, the KC Stadium is a community asset in the most obvious of respects. The local council paid more than £42m towards the cost of...

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