Tag: Hull City

Assem Allam’s Pyrrhic Name Change Poll Victory

There are, of course, lies, damned lies and statistics. It’s worth pointing out before we go any further that the decision of the owners of Hull City AFC to poll their supporters over their desire to change the name of the club to “Hull Tigers” from the start of next season was never terribly likely to have an effect upon FA’s upcoming hearing on the matter. That decision had already been taken before the poll was even made public. But while the club can claim a “victory” of sorts, more than half a glance at the figures involved only confirms that this was as pyrrhic victory as could be imagined. So, before we go any further, let’s have a look at those numbers: Total Eligible Voters: 15,033 Total Votes Cast: 5,874 (39%) “Yes” Votes: 2565 (44% of Votes Cast) & (17% of Eligible Voters) “No” Votes: 2517 (43% of Votes Cast) & (17% of Eligible Voters) “Not Concerned”: 792 (13% of Votes Cast) & (5% of Eligible Voters) The only way that we can view these numbers is, of course, through the prism of what the club may have considered its “PR drive” of the last few months to try and convince supporters of the merits of the name change, which to many others fell somewhere between hectoring, bullying and outright intimidation. As regular observers of this story will...

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Democracy Or Gerrymandering? The Hull City Vote Goes Public

It was noted on this site at least a couple of years ago that democracy in terms of football had the potential to be a double-edged sword. On the one hand, genuine efforts to engage supporters to be active rather than passive in terms of involvement with their clubs arrive at their natural conclusion in the existence of supporters trusts, both at clubs where the trusts are running the show and at those at which they play the vital – but not always popular role – of being a “critical friend.” Democracy, however, can be twisted and spun into something of a façade, offering a veneer of respectability to to something that might otherwise be considered without credibility. The biggest danger of the idea of democratising football was always likely to be its bastardisation. All of this brings us back to the subject of the proposed name change of Hull City to Hull Tigers. As many of you will already be aware, it was confirmed earlier this season that the Football Association would be making a final decision over this rebrand – which, depending on your perspective, has either angered a large number of the club’s supporters or fundamentally split the fan-base – in April, and it was recently confirmed that the FA’s Membership Committee had unanimously recommended to its Council that the application on the part of the...

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A Unanimous Recommendation To Reject: The FA On “Hull Tigers”

In the interests of strict accuracy, it should be pointed that this is not completely a done deal, just yet. It may well have been that the Football Association confirmed this afternoon that their Membership Committee have made a unanimous recommendation to the FA Council to reject Hull City AFC’s proposed to the name of “Hull Tigers.” It may well be that the FA Council could go against the advice of the Membership Committee and vote to allow it, instead. It may well be that the Allems, who haven’t always shown the utmost tact and dignity in their previous public utterances on the matter, choose to go for one further exercise in throwing their toys out of the pram and try to cover their face by acting even more ridiculously over this whole matter than they have already managed. None of these outcomes are completely beyond the realms of possibility, of course, but there can be little question that the announcement – which started as a leak this morning but had escalated to being an official statement on the FA’s website by the middle of the afternoon – that the FA’s Membership Committee were unanimously recommendating rejection of this name change is a major boost to those that have worked so hard for the City Til We Die campaign, whose submission to the Football Association was a controlled, professional...

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A Sort Of Blues Return At Cardiff City

For all the bullying and coming from their club of late, supporters of Hull City can at least take a crumb of comfort from the fact that, on the pitch, their team is holding its own in the Premier League at the moment this season. This isn’t a luxury that is currently being extended to the long-suffering supporters of Cardiff City. These two clubs met in the Premier League yesterday afternoon, and travelling Hull supporters might well have found it instructive to learn a little about what a policy of divide and conquer looks like after a couple of years or so. On the pitch – Hull City in blue, Cardiff City in red and black, of course – things remained as disjointed for Cardiff as they have at any point over the last couple of months or so. Goals from Tomm Huddlestone and Nikica Jelavic had already put anything like a result well beyond the home team by half-time, and a second goal from Jelavic twelve minutes into the second half proved to be the tipping point for some Cardiff supporters. The Cardiff City Stadium started to empty a little after this, and by the closing stages of the match, by which time the visitors were four goals up and cruising to their most comfortable win of the league season so far, there were large gaps in the...

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Divide, Conquer & Scare: Hull City’s War Of Attrition Continues

If the growing feud between Assem Allam and the supporters of Hull City AFC is to be viewed through the prism of being a battle for hearts and minds in some way, then today probably hasn’t been a very good day for Allam. The story appeared in the Hull Daily Mail newspaper and the headline was the obvious one: “Hull City season tickets could go up by 50 per cent if Tigers rebrand rejected.” This is, of course, a ridiculous and offensive idea and for several different reasons. But this also has the feeling of having something of the diversion about it. Previously in this soap opera, he has threatened to sell the club and plumbed frankly extraordinary depths in breaking with any sense of common decency in saying that, of those opposed to his plans, that, “They can die as soon as they want,” a statement so grotesque that it makes one wonder over his mental well-being. What sort of person, we might reasonably ask, would even think that, let alone say it publicly? The accusations of blackmail are an obvious reflex reaction to it all, of course, though who exactly Allam would be looking to blackmail isn’t necessary an easy question to answer. If the FA are as blasé about ticket prices as most people seem to think they are these days, why they should they give...

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