Tag: Enfield Town

Those We Have Lost: Southbury Road, Enfield

For many, many years, there were effectively no new football grounds built in Britain. Over the last quarter of a century, though dozens upon dozens of clubs have bulldozed their ancestral homes and moved on to pastures new. This summer, we hope to run a series of  articles on the subject of Britain’s lost football grounds, and we’re starting this off with a repost from 2009 on the subject of Southbury Road, the late, lamented home of Enfield Football Club. If you are interested in getting involved in this little series, feel free to drop us a line through the Contact box at the top of this page. During the summer of 2007, I decided, apropos nothing, to take a day out to revisit some of the haunts of my childhood. I took the train out of London from Liverpool Street railway station and spent a pleasant couple of hours wandering through Lower and Upper Edmonton. My train journey ended at Bush Hill Park station. I walked the length of St Marks Road, a road which seemed so impossibly long when I was nine years old but now takes barely five minutes to cover, across Main Avenue, a road that four generations of my family grew up in the sight of, through the estate that I lived in for five years and which replaced the rows of terraces that...

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A Matter Of Trust: Some Supporter-Owned Highlights From 2011

It is the end, then, of another long, hard season, and perhaps now is an appropriate time to be looking at how those clubs that are owned and run by their supporters trusts this season managed to fair. As AFC Wimbledon paraded the trophy that confirmed their accession into the Football League nine years after their formation, the words of the FA’s committee, that a new club in the borough would be, “not in the wider interests of football”, have never sounded more hollow. Wimbledon, however, are just one of nineteen clubs in England, Scotland and Wales that are owned by supporters trusts, and they are not the only one of these to have had some degree of success this season. It is worth, then, taking a moment to reflect upon some of the other Supporters Trust-owned clubs that have had cause for celebration this season. Gretna FC 2008: Gretna FC were a prime example of how the sugar daddy model of football club ownership can fail. Funded by Brooks Mileson, the club rose swiftly through the ranks of Scottish football, played in the UEFA Cup and competed in the 2006 Scottish Cup final, where they only lost on penalties to Heart of Midlothian. However, promotion to the Scottish Premier League meant that the club had to abandon its home, Raydale Park, and play its home matches at Motherwell....

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Home Again? Enfield Town, Enfield 1893 And The QEII

The football situation in Enfield, North London, has been confused and fractured for several years. Jason LeBlanc writes on the present and the future of football in the borough. The Prime Minister will be aware that there are two great football clubs in north London, Tottenham Hotspur and Enfield Town. —Labour MP David Lammy (Tottenham) When Mr. Lammy began a request of the Prime Minister in this fashion, it was with a view to the larger club’s desired move on the Olympic Stadium at Stratford.  With the London Olympic Legacy Company seemingly wobbly in its awarding of this post-Olympic property, the Premiership side made an audacious last minute entry into the horse race for the Marshgate Lane stadium that was ultimately thwarted by fellow Premiership side West Ham United and Newham Council.  Tottenham’s bid was likely doomed from the start—what with supporter sentiment mostly against the bid in the form of the “We are N17” protest and the fact there was a former Arsenal man on the board casting a vote. There is a certain history of Tottenham Hotspur and Arsenal when it comes to boardroom votes that never seems to go the way of the Lillywhites.  Conspiracy! (kidding) So, while Daniel Levy and Co. had their attempt loudly denounced and trounced, North London neighbors Paul Millington and the Enfield Supporters Trust quietly went about their business in the...

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Those We Have Lost: Southbury Road, Enfield

This piece is the first of a series of articles intended as personal recollections of some of our lost football grounds. Should you wish to contribute to this series, please feel free to email us via the “Contact” page, which is linked at the top of this page. The first piece in this series takes a fond look back at Southbury Road, the late, lamented home of Enfield Football Club. A couple of years ago I decided, apropos nothing, to take a day out to revisit some of the haunts of my childhood. I took the train out of London from Liverpool Street railway station and spent a pleasant couple of hours wandering through Lower and Upper Edmonton. My train journey ended at Bush Hill Park station. I walked up St Marks Road, a road which seemed so impossibly long when I was nine years old, across Main Avenue, a road that four generations of my family grew up in the sight of, through the estate that I lived in for five years and which replaced the rows of terraces that my grandparents lived most of their adult lives in and across Lincoln Road. I passed the Percival Club, where my father and grandfather had, thirty years apart, both been the snooker champion and up to Southbury Road. If I turned right, I’d end up at the site of...

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Returning Home & New Homes

In non-league football, things are moving and plans are afoot. It looked for some time as if we were heading for a rash of grounds being sold, demolished and converted into luxury apartments. Indeed, over the last ten years we have lost some of the best known non-league grounds, including Hendon’s Claremont Road, Scarborough’s Seamer Road, Aylesbury United’s Buckingham Road, Enfield’s Southbury Road, Slough Town’s Wexham Park and Edgware Town’s The White Lion. There are plenty more, of course. Probably too many to mention. It’s not all doom and gloom, though. You get enough of that on here. This evening, we’re going to take a quick look at four clubs that look as if they may be moving into new facilities or returning home in the next couple of years or so. Slough Town: The falling into disrepair of Slough Town’s Wexham Park became a symbol for the interminable wrangling between clubs and landlords which often threatens to drive clubs to the wall. Slough were evicted from Wexham Park in 2003 and have been trying to find a permanent new home since then, managing to share a ground at Windsor & Eton and Beaconsfield SYCOB as they tumbled down the divisions and out of the Southern League altogether. Last season (after being reprieved thanks to the collapse of Halifax Town) they stabilised somewhat in the Southern Division One South...

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