Tag: Dagenham & Redbridge

John Still Returns To Dagenham

John Still has returned to League Two strugglers Dagenham & Redbridge for a third spell in charge of the club. The sixty-five year old was sacked by Luton Town earlier in the month after three years in charge at Kenilworth Road, having taken the club back into the Football League after an absence of five years. In its first season back in the League, the club finished in a respectable eighth place in League Two, but with expectations high this season, an underwhelming performance this season led to his departure. That position remains vacant at present, with Andy Awford...

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Match Of The Midweek: Dagenham & Redbridge 0-1 Brighton & Hove Albion

So near, yet so far. Brighton & Hove Albion travel to North-East London to play Dagenham & Redbridge in a league match for the first time this evening with the scent of promotion heavy in the air. That Gus Poyet’s team has been the stand-out team in League One this season is inarguable, but in recent weeks they have started to give the impression of being a team that is starting, just starting, to run on empty. They keep on winning – Saturday’s 2-1 win against Swindon Town at Withdean was their seventh in a row – but their performances have become somewhat scrappy in recent weeks. While this deterioration may be a cause for concern in some respects for their supporters, others may interpret it in a more positive light. Brighton have been a little lucky in recent weeks, but that can be even more valuable in the long term than playing well. With a fourteen point gap between the Seagulls and third-placed Peterborough United, the finishing line is almost in sight. Dagenham & Redbridge, however, will provide a stern test this evening. It seems difficult to believe that, just four years ago, they were a non-league club (the most visible remaining remnant of which, their Victoria Road ground, remains a non-league ground at heart in spite having had a smart new stand built at one end of...

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Up The Avenue

Of the smaller clubs that have had runs in the FA Cup over the years, some have had unhappy endings. Enfield, who became a national name in the 1970s and 1980s, have been the subject of a piece on here before, whilst Farnborough Town, who briefly scared the living daylights out of Arsenal as recently in 2003, folded and had to restart again. The spirit of both of those clubs, however, lives on now in brand new clubs which both have brighter and more secure futures ahead of them. One of the most doleful stories that one can tell about the non-league game, however, comes from north-east London, where one of the most famous amateur names of all was swallowed up and spat out, with all attempts at reviving the name having come to nothing. Walthamstow Avenue were one of the great amateur names. Playing at the cramped but idiosyncratically vast Green Pond Road (which was used as one of the football venues for the 1948 Olympic Games), they scared the living daylights out of various Football League Clubs, and won some of the biggest honours in the amateur game. Formed in 1900, they joined the Athenian League in 1929 and won it five times in years before the Second World War brought an end to the normal football programme. At the end of the war they joined the...

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A Brave New World

Whilst noble in principle, the Abercrombie Report could hardly now be described as having been an unqualified success. The report, which advocated the mass decampment of a million and a half people from the overcrowded East End of London, led to the creation of such wonders of post-war architecture as Stevenage, Welwyn Garden City, Hatfield and Harlow. The development of Harlow Town Football Club through the county leagues, into the Athenian League and finally into the Isthmian League in 1974 mirrored the initial success of the town, and its decline during the 1980s was almost eerie in the way that it matched the physical decline of an area that had suffered in the long term as a result of the enforced financial restraints of post-war British town planning. To say that Harlow’s impact upon the FA Cup was sudden and unexpected would be something of an understatement. They had joined the Isthmian League in 1973 when the league expanded to two divisions, but had finished fourth from bottom in their first season and hardly set the world alight in the years immediately in afterwards. In 1979, however, they suddenly and unexpectedly came to life. Under the careful managership of Ian Wolstenholme (who had saved a last minute penalty for Enfield at Wembley in the 1967 FA Amateur Cup Final against Skelmersdale United), they won the Isthmian League by fourteen...

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