Tag: Chester City

The Return Of Stephen Vaughan? Wrexham Beware.

He’s back, and it’s almost if he never went away. The return of Stephen Vaughan onto our radar would be funny, if it weren’t for the fact that his involvement in anything to do with football (or, indeed, rugby league) wasn’t such a portent of doom for those likely to be on the receiving end of him. Vaughan has pitched up for an interview with the Chester Leader, stating that he is part of a consortium that is planning to purchase Blue Square Premier club Wrexham. Vaughan was barred from acting as a company director this time last year after being admitting to carousel fraud (a type of VAT fraud), but he seems to be of the opinion that this will not be an issue because “I would be involved strictly as an investor and would have no part in the day-to-day running of the club”. It is, of course, worth taking a moment to consider Vaughan’s recent in history in the game. He resigned his position at Barrow AFC in 1998 after an HMRC investigation into money laundering at the club, but this didn’t stop Barrow being liquidated in January of 1999 and the club being demoted from the Football Conference at the end of the 1998/99 season. It later transpired that Vaughan had unlawfully transferred the ownership of the club’s Holker Street ground into that of his...

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Uncomfortable Questions For Chester

After the insults from almost all quarters and months of hard work, Chester FC, the club borne from the ashes of the Vaughan family’s disastrous spell in charge of Chester City, will start the forthcoming season in Division One of the Evo-Stick (formerly the Unibond) League. Amongst the goodwill, good intentions and idealism of the new club, an uglier side to the new club reared its head during their first ever match, a pre-season friendly at Colwyn Bay last Saturday. Outbreaks of trouble throughout the day resulted in damage being caused to the Colwyn Bay ground, and the trouble was sufficient for their next match, another friendly match against Rhyl, who were demoted from the Welsh Premier League into the Cyrmu Alliance earlier this summer, to be cancelled as well. The specifics of what happened at Llanelian Road on Saturday are, largely, neither here nor there. Talk on the club’s forum has ranged from a handful of people drinking too much to the police over-reacting to a situation that could have been otherwise avoiding, but blanket denials that there was a significant problem at the match have fallen upon deaf ears.  There were around 1,500 Chester supporters at the match on Saturday, and the uppermost estimate of the number of people that were involved in any trouble seems to be around twenty to thirty individuals. The fact of the...

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Chester Football Club Gets The Deva Stadium

The email arrived this morning  – a press release issued by City Fans United, the supporters organisation that brought the supporters of the fractured club together, mobilised them, organised them against the cancer that was killing their club and then picked up the pieces from the wreckage of it all and starting making arrangements for the future. It was embargoed at the request of Cheshire West and Chester Council until a minute past midnight, possible to coincide with general election day, possibly for benefit of the local press, but now we can finally reveal the happy ending. Chester Football Club, the nascent club formed by CFU with the overwhelming support of its local community, local business and the supporters of the now deceased Chester City FC, has been given the lease for The Deva Stadium. The news marks the end of a tale that started this time last year, when the transfer of ownership of Chester City Football Club was quietly passed from Stephen Vaughan into that of his son, Stephen Vaughan Junior, thus setting in motion a chain of events that led to where we ended up today. It was a sequence that no-one could have predicted, considering that Chester City were, this time last year, a Football League club. A flawed and failed attempt to push through a CVA led to the club facing expulsion from the...

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What Chester Did Next

In less than seven days time, representatives from City Fans United will sit down with members of Cheshire West and Chester Council. The aim of CFU is to secure the lease on The Deva Stadium, a council owned football facility that sits on the western-most outskirts of the city. They aren’t unopposed in their application for the lease. The Danish group, whoever they may be (and the rumour has now started that those “advising the group” are considerably closer to home than is likely to be made public in the near future), have decided to ignore the requests of the CFU committee and of a broader cross-section of the club’s supporters and press ahead with their application for use of the stadium. It is their prerogative to do so but, in turn, it is also the right of Chester supporters to shun them in favour of the club that is promising that the mess of the last twelve months can and must never happen again. We already know that the FA has directed anybody seeking the licence to be a phoenix club for Chester with the benefits that this brings has already been directed to CFU. Any other bidder would be a completely new club and, as such, would have to start at the bottom of the football pyramid unless they could prove that safety issues at away matches...

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The Chester City Aftermath: Self-Serving In The Blue Square Premier

In the latest edition of what has long since become an ongoing saga, the annual Football Conference summer crisis seems likely to loom large on the horizon with the confirmation that ten Blue Square Premier clubs are appealing the decision to expunge the record of Chester City to the Football Association following the club’s expulsion from the league last month. It might seem odd that these ten clubs are appealing what seems to be the only sensible way to deal with the fall-out from the club’s collapse, but the truth of the matter is that any sense of “justice” that may be emanating from these ten clubs has, in all honesty, many of the hallmarks of being about their own interests rather than being fair in any way. There is, it has to be said, some degree of obfuscation regarding the rules concerning what happens to a league should a club go to the wall in the middle of this season. This, thankfully, is because such circumstances are so very rare. On the overwhelming majority of cases that this has happened before, however, the offending club’s record has been wiped from the record. It’s what happened when Accrington Stanley folded in February 1962, when Newport County folded (whilst in what is now known as the Blue Square Premier) in February 1989 and when Aldershot left the Football League in...

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