Tag: Celtic

The Old Firm: Mea Culpa

The main hazard attached to stridency of opinion is that you are often wrong. Sometimes, my success rate is in line with a stopped clock. And it appears my suggestion that Celtic were more sinned against than sinner in their recent Scottish Cup victory over Rangers was wide of the mark. The Scottish Football Association’s disciplinary process has found Celtic manager Neil Lennon to be primarily responsible for the disgraceful scenes during and after the match, scenes that were so shameful they needed a Scottish government summit to sort out. So what else can I say but sorry? Watching the game on TV, wanting Celtic to win, I allowed myself to be swayed by the card count (thirteen – three reds and seven yellows to Rangers ), by Rangers defender Majid Bougherra’s so-called manhandling of match referee Calum Murray and the parallel-universe behaviour of El-Hadji Diouf. This was, of course, unfair. Lennon was clearly the main culprit. Rangers didn’t go looking for the cards. And they signed Diouf as a former African Player of the Year with extensive experience in the English Premier League. How could they know he was going to behave like that in an Old Firm game? Referee Murray’s card-happiness was certainly exposed by Steven Whittaker’s unfair dismissal, as I acknowledged in my original article on this site on this subject (Celtic and Rangers: Old Firm,...

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Celtic & Rangers: Old Firm, Old Enmity, New Century

Imagine different circumstances surrounding Manchester United’s defeat at Liverpool last Sunday. Leave aside Jamie Carragher’s nasty tackle on Nani, Nani’s ability to race to the referee before collapsing in an injured heap and the glorious sight, which may stay with me forever, of referee Phil Dowd, arms folded, watching from a distance like a disapproving dinner lady on playground duty at a primary school as players from both sides got their handbags out.  Imagine instead, that United had three players sent off and nine booked. Imagine Nani crossing three-parts of the Anfield pitch to the Liverpool bench to confront Kenny Dalglish et al after the first dismissal. Make Carragher’s tackle a genuine yellow card offence, rather than the red card offence it was and have Sammy Lee pointing an accusing finger at Paul Scholes as the team’s entered the tunnel at half-time. Then imagine Wayne Rooney, already booked for raking his studs down the back of Dirk Kuyt’s leg with the ball elsewhere, sliding in on Luis Suarez in the last minute and dumping him into some pitch-side photographers before joining two-thirds of his colleagues in buffeting Dowd and attempting to snatch the yellow card from Dowd’s hand. Move on to the final whistle and imagine United’s players are into Dowd again, jostling him and threatening him, with Ryan Giggs sent off for his part. Then imagine Giggs walking...

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Clearing Up A Few Loose Ends: Celtic, Portsmouth And (Briefly) Wednesday

It’s the football scandal of a generation. And it won’t go away. Colleen Rooney, photographed blatantly sipping a cool drink by a holiday swimming  pool… while there’s a recession on!! I mean not one single British passport holder anywhere else in the world has done that in the last week. As to whether that shite really does sell newspapers, that’s a debate for someone else to start. I don’t know enough to offer an informed opinion, so I won’t offer any opinion. Something for Mail columnist Martin Samuel to ponder next time he writes about Uefa’s “financial fair play” regulations.   But elsewhere in football, while the lenses and laptops have flitted back and forth across the M62, there have been one or two real scandals. I’m confident most of you will have someone say that “there’s no use arguing with referees, they won’t change their mind.” Well… wrong. And I’m not talking about Tom Huddlestone at Fulham, where referee Mike Read gave Spurs winner after the hulking Spurs midfielder suggested Read and his assistant ought to have a chat about the use of said assistant’s flag. At Fulham, Read had not decided whether Spurs’ William Gallas, standing in an offside position, was actually “offside” as per the laws of the game. Thus we had a remarkable situation. No, not Read’s discussion with his assistant before giving the goal....

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Morris Woodman’s Tactical Chalkboard: Celtic

Morris Woodman is England’s most successful football manager.  In 13 seasons in the crucible of the Zambian top flight, his team Spartak Thunderbolts are yet to lose a single game.  During last summer’s World Cup, Twohundredpercent’s own Mungo McCrackas met up with Woodman and asked him if he would be willing to provide weekly tactical analysis of the British game for our site.  He said yes.  Specifically, he said he would do it for a large sum of money which we are far too professional to disclose the full details of. Since which time, we’ve all had to stop eating, wearing clothes or living indoors.  But it has possibly been worth it, and we can now present the first of Morris Woodman’s tactical chalkboards.  This week: he looks at how Celtic can bounce back from their midweek European disappointment. Click picture for full...

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County Deepen Celtic’s Woes

When the draw for the Scottish Cup semi-finals was made all the talk was of Rangers and Celtic being kept apart for a potential Old Firm final. It hasn’t quite worked out that way. Rangers didn’t even reach the semis in the end, losing to a scruffy but deserved last minute goal in their quarter-final replay at Dundee United; but it’s Celtic’s semi-final humiliation at the hands of Ross County which is the real story. County have attracted few headlines since their admission to the league in 1994, being often overshadowed by near-neighbours Inverness who were admitted at the same time. But while Inverness have made faster progress – and look well placed for a quick return to the SPL following last season’s relegation – County have risen surely but steadily, with relegation back to the second division in 2007 as only a temporary setback. In November of that year Derek Adams took over as manager. It was a bold and forward-looking decision – Adams was only 32 at the time – but he’s a feisty character a little in the Billy Davies mould, capable of appearing both thoughtful and pugnacious. He immediately set about justifying his appointment, the team going on a run of ten straight wins over the turn year as they coasted to promotion. The following season saw first division survival only on the final day...

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