Tag: Celtic

Mal From Ayr, Kilmarnock Fan Extraordinaire

Since the full extent of Rangers’ financial troubles was exposed in 2010, their fans have almost totally refused to accept that their club is to blame for anything at all ever. One manifestation of this is the accusation that any critic of the Rangers must be a bigot, an obsessive, a Celtic fan, or all three. Anyone claiming support for, say, Albion Rovers, or Kingstonian, is almost automatically branded a liar. For years, Celtic fans have seen Rangers fans throughout the media like some sort of bastardised “sixth sense” (“I see blue-nosed people”). So this isn’t a one-way or new phenomenon within the confines of Glasgow football fandom. But sometimes, when it looks like a Rangers/Celtic fan and sounds like a Rangers/Celtic fan, it IS a Rangers/Celtic fan, as was exposed for the nation to hear last Saturday evening, on BBC Radio 5 Live’s famous “6-0-6” phone-in programme. A “Kilmarnock fan,” Mal, from Ayr, phoned in to complain about the Scottish media’s obsession with Celtic’s 2-1 Champions League defeat of Barcelona at Celtic Park. There has been something of a Celtic love-fest in the Anglocentric national media. And some could argue that there is a brush of double standard about lauding Celtic for the method of their victory, while bemoaning Chelsea for their method of becoming European Champions last spring. But Celtic’s win over a Barcelona side of such...

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To Boo Or Not To Boo? Why There Is A Time & Place For Dissent

Three games into the Premier League season, the distinctive sound of burning pitchforks is in the air. Without a win from the six matches that they have played between them, both Andre Villa Boas and Brendan Rodgers are already being cast into a familiar mould – that of the hapless managerial failure. Both are managers whose appointments carried an element of risk about them. Villa Boas excelled at Porto in a way that few other managers have in recent years in coaching this team to the Europa League and the Portuguese championship, but his stock fell with his turbulent spell at Stamford Bridge, while Rodgers arrival at Liverpool came off the back of success at Swansea City but a nagging concern that his name might not be of the pedigree that supporters of that particular club might have expected. After their opening matches of the season, though, both managers are already falling towards a familiar looking black hole of ridicule and contempt, but to what extent is this a reflection of the football culture that we inhabit rather than their respective managerial abilities. There was a time when media coverage of the game was considerably more scarce than it is now, and it doesn’t seem implausible to suggest that this saturation coverage has an effect upon the attitude of some supporters. Every Premier League match is An Event, to...

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Going South? Celtic & The English League System

It is one of the most commonly recurring stories of modern football. Should Celtic and Rangers be allowed to leave the Scottish league system and join the English football league system instead? It’s an emotive subject, for sure, and it’s one that seems to divide both supporters and administrators, with the only people that are certain of which way they would like to go being those that run Glasgow’s two giant clubs, who would like to utilise the vaster resources that would be open to them as a result of being in the more lucrative English system than they would get from remaining in England. That such a debate should be happening again now is hardly a surprise. Speculation has restarted over the last few days that Celtic are in negotiation with the Football League over being allowed to jettison the Scottish Premier League and join the English league system in League One. Whilst there is little solid to confirm how far such discussions have progressed, it could be argued that the fact that joining League One has been mentioned is a specific enough frame of reference for there to be something in this story. It could also be considered that this specific position in the league system reflects the extent to which the clubs of the Championship dominate the Football League, and that the idea of “compromise” may...

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A Celtic Encounter

Every so often events conspire to make us question whether there is indeed some footballing god directing proceedings from, somewhere. After UEFA’s initial decision to remove Swiss club FC Sion from the Europa League, the club they had previously beaten on aggregate in the final playoff round–that club being Celtic FC–were awarded their place in Group I in their stead. Thrown into a rather deep group containing the likes of La Liga’s Atlético Madrid, French representative Stade Rennais, and a Serie A side in Udinese likely of Champions League calibre, it appeared the Scottish side should have been cursing that football god for their rotten luck at being granted a reprieve in Europe yet likely destined to advance no further against the quality saturating that particular group. The Zeus of football rarely spells out his omnipotent power so clearly though, so we must work a bit harder to seek out the divine inspiration. Either through a deity’s hand or just sheer coincidence, Celtic’s next two Europa League fixtures see them travel to Rennes to play at Route de Lorient against Rennes for the first time before entertaining their Breton opponents back in Parkhead. While both clubs have been active in European competitions over the decades, their paths have never crossed until these two Group I matches were scheduled (or more accurately, when Celtic replaced FC Sion). Now, perhaps this comes down...

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Matters of Hearth & Home in the SPL

There exists evidence to the contrary that a man’s home is his castle. To begin, seeing as how there are so few men living in castles these days, owing to their relatively poor resale value and faulty electrical wiring incapable of  handling the wattage necessary to capture the beautiful game in breathtaking HD, castles just aren’t prime real estate these days. Stripping away the rather antiquated phrase and applying it to football, there is the simple matter that where a club plays its home matches no longer appears the refuge it might once have been. Instead, for those clubs operated more so with an eye to being a business organisation keen on extending their brand or reinvention as a 21st century enterprise, monuments of yesteryear might be seen simultaneously as albatrosses weighing down portfolios, prime real estate worth more to commercial interests than footballing ones, no longer fit for purpose of any kind, too small for modern spectator events, or leveraging instruments during club ownership negotiations. With London clubs such as Tottenham, Chelsea, West Ham United popping up in the news recently regarding where their next moats will be dug around, and with discussions about future castle construction on Merseyside ongoing, stadiums are a hot topic of late, and any or all of these perspectives on their current residences have been submitted. As England is having a sneeze over...

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