Tag: Bognor Regis Town

Didn’t We Have A Lovely Time, The Day We Went To… Bognor

“We hate Worthing and we hate Worthing, we hate Worthing and we hate Worthing, we hate Worthing and we hate Worthing,” they sing with enthusiasm bordering on glee, “we are the Worthing… haters.” I’m not offended. I’ve only lived in Worthing for four months, so they’re probably not singing about me personally. And perhaps even citizens of Worthing who may find themselves offended by being hated by a small proportion of the population of Bognor Regis should consider the fact that such a rivalry even remains remembered when the two towns’ football clubs are separated by a division in...

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Monsoon Conditions Fail To Dampen The Renewal Of A Sussex Rivalry

Leaving Brighton yesterday afternoon for the Boxing Day match between Lewes and Bognor Regis Town, all seemed quiet and all seemed fine. There was a little light rain in the air and a chill in the air which merited the addition of an extra layer, but nothing excessive. Spirits couldn’t even be dampened by the decision of Southern Rail to not run any Boxing Day trains between Brighton and Lewes, meaning that we had to make this relative short journey by bus instead. By the time that the full time whistle blew at The Dripping Pan yesterday afternoon, however, the horizontal nature of the rain washing across the pitch meant that the players weren’t the only people in the ground that were soaked to the skin, and whilst the players had the consolation of having had an hour and a half’s worth of decent cardiovascular exercise to keep themselves warm, all that the rest of us could do was to squelch to club bar or the nearest pub and drink mulled wine in an attempt to stave off what was starting to feel, by this time, like the inevitable onset of hypothermia. In the overall scheme of things, the rivalry between East and West Sussex might not count for much in the overall football universe, but it was enough to drag almost 900 people – the highest crowd of...

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Final Day Shoot-Outs In The Ryman League

It is not that often that league title races are open enough to go to the final day of the season with the whereabouts of the championship trophy still undecided, but this season two of the divisions of the Ryman League will end with five clubs still hoping to win automatic promotion as champions of their division. In the Premier Division, the race is already over with Billericay Town having clinched the title and promotion to the Blue Square BetĀ last weekend, but the two divisions below this, no less than five clubs will go into the final day with the hope amongst hopes that they could still avoid the play-offs and lift a piece of silverware.Ā  In the Division One North it is a straight two-way battle between Leiston and Enfield Town, but even this is a race that perhaps should have been over sooner. Leiston had managed to pull clear a little at the top of the table, but they then stumbled and last weekend travelled to North London to play an Enfield side that had been doggedly hanging on in their slipstream. In front of a season-high crowd of 602 and with the clock ticking past ninety minutes the score was goalless. It looked as if Leiston were going to hang on for the point that they needed to secure the title, but a penalty in stoppage...

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Match Of The Week Part I: Bognor Regis Town 1-5 AFC Wimbledon

The story of Bognor Regis Town is largely the story of Jack Pearce. Pearce arrived at the club as a twenty-one year old in 1970 as a full-back, with the club in the Second Division of the Sussex County League. Six years later, with the club having won two successive promotions into the Southern League, Pearce took over as manager at the age of twenty-six. In 1982, in a move that was almost unprecedented for the time, they requested a move into the Isthmian League to reduce their travel costs, and this was arguably the start of the most successful period in their history, with promotion to the Premier Division of the Isthmian League and FA Cup runs that included wins against Swansea City and Exeter City. The club’s decline started with Pearce’s resignation on October 2007. He took over as their General Manager, but the club had to slash its wage budget and only narrowly avoided relegation at the end of last season. It looked as if the club had overcome the worst of its troubles when Mick Jenkins and Andy Awford took over as managers last summer, having brought in new board members to clear the club debts, but disaster struck at the end of August, when an arsonist burnt the club’s bar to the ground. The bar accounted for roughly one-third of the club’s takings over...

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