Tag: Blackpool

Why Blackpool Had To Be Fined For Fielding Their Reserves

In what may be seen as slightly surprising news, the FA Premier League fined Blackpool £25,000 for fielding an under-strength side. The slight surprise was that, in fining the Seasiders, the punishment was harsher than the suspended fine handed down to Wolverhampton Wanderers in similar circumstances last season. Considering the similarities in the two situations, a punishment of some sort was always expected, and while Blackpool, and manager Ian Holloway are yet to pass official comment on the situation, although there are claims that Holloway has not tendered his resignation, as he claimed he would do. Would Blackpool be right to be aggrieved at the decision? First of all, let’s be clear – unlike certain other Premier League clubs – Blackpool are not extravagant spenders, nor are they one of the richer clubs in the league. The fine is the equivalent of three weeks wages for most (if not all) of the Seasiders’ higher paid players, so it’s not the toothless punishment that certain other clubs. Notwithstanding the fine, prize money in the Premier League is based on the position the club finishes in the table, and had a full-strength Blackpool beaten Aston Villa that night, they would currently be sitting in eighth – worth approximately £3m more than the 12th position that they currently occupy. The Premier League have explained their decision by taking into account the team...

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Ian Holloway Should Put Olly Out To Pasture

Pretty much everyone in football must have an admiration for what Ian Holloway has achieved at Blackpool, even if it is only a sneaking admiration. I’ve advocated awarding Bournemouth’s Eddie Howe two “manager-of-the-year” awards for they way he has turned AFC Bournemouth’s fortunes around from minus seventeen points at the bottom of League Two to their current fourth place in League One. Holloway would have been a close runner-up at least once. And while Blackpool’s start to Premier League life may yet prove to be a “Hull” (or a “Reading” or an “Ipswich” or the numerous teams who succumbed to “second season syndrome”), for the moment they are there to be admired. But when a microphone appears, Ian Holloway the manager seems to be replaced by “Olly”, a talkative, combative “character” in the inverted commas sense of the word… with a funny accent to boot and a disdain for authority which is all the rage at the minute in the face of government cuts and FIFA corruption.  “The game” has always “needed characters” – even in the days when they supposedly had them. The recent passing away of Malcolm Allison vividly reminded us of that, especially the few clips of him as a TV studio pundit, holding forth in a manner that nearly made Jimmy Hill tear his chin off and makes Alan Shearer seem, I dunno… dull (that...

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Under-Strength Teams And The Twenty-Five Man Squad Rule

There can be little doubt that, for the moment at least, the Premier League is more competitive than it has been in recent years, with just six points seperating Bolton Wanderers, in fifth place in the table, from Birmingham City, who currently occupy the third of the division’s relegation places. Even Chelsea, at the top of the table, have lost three matches from their opening thirteen. It is against this admittedly unusual background that the recent decision of Ian Holloway to make ten changes to his team for their match against Aston Villa has to be framed. Although Aston Villa only won that match by an odd goal in five (with that goal coming with just a couple of minutes of the match left to play), might a “full-strength” Blackpool team have held on for a point or managed to scrape another unlikely away win? Comparisons have been drawn between Holloway’s selection last week and that made by the Wolverhampton Wanderers manager Mick McCarthy for Wolves’ trip to Old Trafford to play Manchester United last year. McCarthy rested a number of players for this midweek match (which Wolves lost 3-0) ahead of a match against Burnley at the weekend. Wolves beat Burnley and finished the season in the Premier League, while Burnley were relegated. He would doubtlessly reason that the end of season league table vindicated his decision, but...

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Match Of The Midweek: Blackpool 2-1 West Bromwich Albion

The early season is over now. The clocks have gone back, which means that there will be precious few matches that finish in daylight between now and next spring, and in commemoration of this fact the Premier League rolled out the luminous yellow ball last weekend. There is something deeply aesthetically unsatisfying about the yellow ball. Marketing fools still doubtlessly proffer the argument that it is somehow more “visible” than a white ball, as if we are incapable of seeing through their guff, but still they press ahead with it. The ball isn’t the only affront to the eyes at Bloomfield Road this evening, either. Both Blackpool and West Bromwich Albion have their shirts adorned with sponsors’ logos which defy all logic by making the companies – a payday loan company and an emergency insurance company respectively – that they are flogging even less unattractive than they may already be. Fortunately, there is much, much more to this game than aesthetic concerns. This match was almost certainly selected for live television broadcast on the basis that it would be a relegation six-pointer, but West Bromwich Albion at least are defying the pre-season odds with a string of excellent results, including taking seven points out of nine from matches against Manchester City, Arsenal and Manchester United. Moreover, they have done it with a degree of style and panache (they scored...

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The Intrigue Surrounding Karl Oyston’s “Bankruptcy”

Blackpool Football Club’s first season in the top division of English football since 1971 has started reasonably well, but the last few months haven’t necessarily have gone quite as successfully for their former chairman, Karl Oyston. While his team has only lost one of its four Premier League matches so far this season and currently sits in fourth place in the table, Oyston has faced difficulties in his private life and resigned as the chairman of the club last month. This week, however, the Premier League confirmed that they are to investigate his ongoing role as the club’s acting Chief Executive after he was reportedly declared bankrupt last month and was, under Premier League and FA rules, forced to resign his position as the chairman of the club. The Oyston family are no strangers to controversy or indeed the courts. Oyston’s father, Owen, was also the chairman of Blackpool during the 1990s and was imprisoned in May 1996 for six years, having been found guilty of the rape of a young model. He appealed the case but the conviction was upheld in December 1997 and he was made to pay £100,000 in court costs. He engaged the services of Max Clifford ahead of the trial with a view to improving his image. As this remarkable little tidbit from Marketing Week in July 1997 states: Clifford is understood to be...

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