2009 – Year Of Missing The Point

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4 Responses

  1. ejh says:

    Thing is, football journalism and financial journalism as actually practised actually have a lot in common, and what they have in common is a large tendency to power-worship in the specific form of success-worship. In both fields there’s a notable (though not entire) absence of criticism of people who are seen to have made a lot of money and a general reluctance to ask whether that has been done on solid foundations or through ethical means. Hence in both fields it’s normally a big shock when everything goes wrong and there’s a mountain of debt and a trail of lies left behind.

    Both fields find it hard to get beyond treating the successful as laudable and the unsuccessful as those deserving of criticism, without asking wider questions (as opposed to locating individual errors as the reasons for individual failures). I remember finding the coverage of the ITV Digital collapse, which you mention, unsatisfactory because it all tended to blame the affected clubs for having assumed that they would receive money they were contracted to receive, which didn’t necessarily constitute an unreasonable assumption from where I was standing. (I also felt there was a certain amount of Monday-morning quarterbacking going on, in so far as I couldn’t recall too many journos having written BEWARE pieces when the contacts were actually announced.)

    “They’ve made a lot of money, so they must know what they’re doing and who are you to question them” is a very contemporary ethic, but I don’t think it’s any more applicable to the world of football journalism than its financial equivalent. In each instance it’s the rule, and in each instance there are individual exceptions to it. They are two similar fields and so, I think, are the worlds on which they offer reportage.

  2. Martin says:

    It would be hilarious if real finance was reported in the same bizarre, biased, ignorant and sicophantic way as football finances are. Football journalism really is very poor, apart from excellent sites like this of course.

    Ken Bates publishing Levi’s address and phone number in a Leeds programme, to presumably encourage their fans to contact him, or worse, was a new low even for him.

    There will never be an adequate Fit and Proper Person’s test whilst the likes of Bates still passes it.

  1. January 1, 2010

    […] Review Of The Year: 2009 – The Year Of Missing The Point “Financial and football journalism have long been distant cousins. And since the formation of the Premier League in 1992, that has largely not mattered. This year, however, it has. Give or take a Norman Lamont-inspired week or two during its inaugural season, the Premier League has lived through economic boom times allied with a bottomless pit of broadcast revenue from that bottomless pit of broadcast evil, Rupert Murdoch. The burning monetary question for most fans has been ‘what comes after billion?’” (twohundredpercent) […]

  2. January 4, 2010

    […] 2009 – Year Of Missing The Point “Financial and football journalism have long been distant cousins. And since the formation of the Premier League in 1992, that has largely not mattered. This year, however, it has. Give or take a Norman Lamont-inspired week or two during its inaugural season, the Premier League has lived through economic boom times allied with a bottomless pit of broadcast revenue from that bottomless pit of broadcast evil, Rupert Murdoch. The burning monetary question for most fans has been ‘what comes after billion?’” (twohundredpercent) […]

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