100 Owners: Number 81 – Irving Scholar (Tottenham Hotspur & Nottingham Forest)

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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5 Responses

  1. King Glenn says:

    Very interesting article. I met Irving Scholar back in the mid Eighties and he was a very charismatic guy, but definitely his own greatest fan. As was once said of another from our parish, “if he’d been made of chocolate he’d have eaten himself.” That said, he had a vision and much of his business analysis was spot on. However, business and football have always been uncomfortable bedfellows. COYS.

  2. RedD says:

    Scholar and co at Forest….asset stripping disaster group…’money,money money !’…..as the song goes !

  3. Jim Jones says:

    Amongst the optimism following the Al Hasawi family takeover at Forest, this article reminds us of the challenges that the late Nigel Doughty had to overcome to gain control of the football club that he loved and supported since childhood. The Al Hasawi family are very welcome but it is possible that they would not have pursued their interest their interest in Forest had they faced similar obstacles. Renaming the academy the Nigel Doughty Academy was very appropriate, without his contribution, Forest would not exist today.

  1. March 28, 2013

    [...] It’s not unusual for football clubs to try and get around rules intended to ensure fair play on a  technicality. Looking back historically, it was illegal for football clubs to be traded on the Stock Exchange to prevent clubs being used for financial speculation. In 1983, Irving Scholar’s Tottenham got around this by creating a new company whose only asset was the football club, and then putting this company on the Stock Exchange instead. [...]

  2. March 30, 2013

    [...] It’s not unusual for football clubs to try and get around rules intended to ensure fair play on a  technicality. Looking back historically, it was illegal for football clubs to be traded on the Stock Exchange to prevent clubs being used for financial speculation. In 1983, Irving Scholar’s Tottenham got around this by creating a new company whose only asset was the football club, and then putting this company on the Stock Exchange instead. [...]

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