Pitching Up & Pitching Out In Durham

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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8 Responses

  1. David Howell says:

    I still can’t see the name ‘3G artificial pitch’ and not think of mobile phones. :)

  2. Nik says:

    Surely the Northern League has some degree of responsibility in all this too. Had they accepted inclusion into the national pyramid, rather than standing aloof, then the fast-tracking of both Durham and Newcastle Blue Star may not have been required, and we would not be looking at a season in which, realistically, there is only one relegation slot available.

    This has been a torrid summer for clubs of all sizes, from Chester downwards. At some point, the authorities must surely take action to ensure that they are actually governing the sport, rather than serving their own interests.

  3. mr.southampton says:

    I’ve played five-a-side on a what seems to match the description of a 3G artificial pitch for the past couple of years.

    Whilst it is much better than traditional astro, no astro burns being the biggest bonus, it is definately not as good as grass.

    The surface is just not as good a shock absorber as grass. The main issue resulting from this is the impact on your joints, particularly your knees. I certainly wouldn’t want to use the surface long term or more than once a week.

  4. jim says:

    the thing i find amazing is the arrogance of durham thinking they would walk the unibond league and progress to the conference north this season arrogant fools serves them right and good riddance to you when you take your laughing stock of a club back to the tinpot northern league. DONT BOTHER COMING BACK!

  5. Albert Ross says:

    It looks like Durham’s problems are as much to do with their backers as their pitch…

    The whole 3G thing aside, the position of the Northern League and its teams is a strange one. They suffered from staying outside the pyramid for too long, and instead of being on a par with the Northern Premier which they could have been, they effectively began to stagnate which did the cause of North-Eastern Football no good at all. The more ambitious clubs that wanted to climb the pyramid went elsewhere, and now you have a league that is still in many ways strangely insular… on a number of occasions (probably more years than not) the champions have not taken promotion to the Unibond, whether because of ground grading or because of other reasons. I know from talking to a couple of fans of NWCL teams that they found this highly frustrating – there were teams with serious ambitions there with only one promotion place to aim at, while the likes of Bedlington Terriers were winning the Northern League and staying there. The implication was that they didn’t see why the other place couldn’t be played off for between the NWCL and NCEL runners up, and the Northern League wasn’t exactly well thought-of.

    While ultimately it is down to the clubs themselves, I get the impression that live in the NL is not exactly great preparation for the step up to the Unibond, and Durham and Blue Star don’t exactly dispel that impression. NL is in many ways something of a footballing backwater, a comfortable place for a lot of its teams while anyone with serious ambitions passes through….

  1. November 11, 2009

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  2. February 13, 2010

    [...] were told that their artificial pitch would mean they were unable to go any higher up the leagues: Two Hundred Percent: Durham’s New Ferens Park was fitted with a 3G pitch a couple of years ago. The pitch is at the [...]

  3. February 4, 2011

    [...] allowed in the Conference North should Durham win a further promotion, their sponsors pulled out, just as the 2009-10 season was kicking off. The club had to offload their players and play out the season with a scratch side recruited mostly [...]

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