Coventry City’s Relegation Marks A New Low For SISU

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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5 Responses

  1. phil roberts says:

    Excellent article. Unless SISU know something we don’t, the ownership of the stadium is ultimately owned bo the City Council – politicians in other word – who would be committing political suicide if they sold to SISU, such is the local feeling against them
    Given the Coventry supporters in the media, in finance and in national politics, and suspicion of the football authorities, SISU will be walking a very rocky road in the future
    Quite why they do not cut their losses and sell to Hoffman is a mystery, because their financial losses must increase next season

  2. Fat Dave says:

    Dont agree. Most people in the City dont care about the football club.

    They care more about money being wasted propping up a failing Sky Blues business.

  3. PHIL BUNN says:

    WHILE I WAS UP THE MATCH YESTERDAY WE LOOKED TIRED FROM THE START AND WE WERE NOT EXPECTING ANY MIRACLES.THE END OF THE MATCH CAME AND THEN IT BECAME SUREAL PEOPLE STANDING AROUND WATCHING A TOTAL OVEREACTION FROM SOME PEOPLE IN THE STADIUM WHO SHALL REMAIN NAMELESS .OBERSERVATION BRING THEM SUCCESS AND THEY WILL COME NEXT SEASON GET IN AND ABOUT THE TOPSPOT AND YOU WOULD GET GATES OF 20,000 EACH WEEK SIMPLE YEA

  4. Polly says:

    I think that Coventry should seek a merger with other local struggling clubs.

    Fighting against Manchester United’s 75,000 attendances and millions of fans around the world for revenue is a thankless task, especially if you only have about 50,000 people who are in any way interested in your club and less than half of them ever turn up to matches.

    So the rumours are that Birmingham City will also be in dire straights if they don’t get promoted this year, why don’t Coventry, Birmingham and say Wolves all join together and pool fanbases? It seems simple enough.

    On the south coast Bournemouth, Portsmouth and Southampton could join forces, their weekly attendances combined would rival those of Manchester United and a sense of community would be created where division and rivalry existed.

    Having 92 professional football clubs, and hundreds of other smaller and even less viable operations below that is a waste of time and effort, your club is never going to be swimming with the big fish while you are fighting small and petty battles with other small and meaningless clubs from five miles up the road.

    If there were fewer clubs with larger fanbases football would be more competitive and the whole country could get excited about their region’s clubs rather than just those living in Manchester and London.

    Its time to put aside petty rivalries and join forces together to be a big club with a big fanbase and big revenues.

    Viva FFP.

  5. First became properly aware of the struggle at CCFC when Bristol City came up to Cov on Boxing Day, we read the protest leaflets anc I for one, fuilly sympathise with the fans. The FA let fans down by failing to get invovled with this sort of thing, reminds me of their “fair and reasonable” Policy which has left a dark cloud over clubs like Doncaster, Leeds and Pompey (and any other club the likes of Ridsdale and Mandaric get thier hands on!). I hope CCFC regroup and come back stronger, with new owners who care more about football than money. Good luck for 12/13 both on and off the pitch.

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