Barcelona And The Sacrifice Of Principles

Ian

Ian began writing Twohundredpercent in May 2006. He lives in Brighton. He has also written for, amongst others, Pitch Invasion, FC Business Magazine, The Score, When Saturday Comes, Stand Against Modern Football and The Football Supporter. Ian was the first winner of the Socrates Award For Not Being Dead Yet at the 2010 NOPA awards for football bloggers.

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4 Responses

  1. David Howell says:

    I would not be shocked in the least if the simple answer to this is “to meet Financial Fair Play requirements”. If memory serves, even Manchester Buccaneers are closer to meeting those than Barca, and the dismantling of one of the great club sides of recent decades will be inevitable.

    That would imply inflated wages, but not inflated transfer fees; the Villa signing may still be Barca’s last of note for years.

    I had the chutzpah to comment on Barca’s financial situation on a 606 thread discussing the 5-0, and was shouted down by many who pointed out how many of the team were developed in-house. Not the point, as one sagely remarked; Bojan is alleged to be on about €60,000 per week (and you thought Winston Bogarde was a highly-paid bench-warmer), Messi and Iniesta have signed multi-million-euro contracts, and there were significant losses on Ibrahimovic and Chygrynskiy.

  2. Tony Pearson says:

    Indeed this is nowhere near being as big an issue as it is being reported as in the media. Or at least, the British media is 7 years late (no surprise there). The club members voted in favour of allowing shirt sponsorship in one of Laporta’s first proposals as president. Without this, even Unicef would not have been seen on the shirts. At the time upon getting approval, the club agreed a massive shirt deal with bwin, but then backed out after the social mass expressed doubts about the morality of having a bookmaker as the main shirt sponsor.

  3. A hugely informative article as I had no idea that Barcelona were in so much debt. Yet another example of how the financial affairs of clubs are glossed over in the media. I enjoy watching the Catalans as much as anyone but the news that they are perhaps, as you say, “no better” than others with far less appealing PR is disappointing.

    As for shirt sponsorship, the likes of West Brom and West Ham in recent seasons have had spells minus sponsors – albeit through no choice of their own. There’s no question, the Baggies’ kit this season is one of the most appealing in the Premier League, not least because kit manufacturers Umbro always seem slightly less malevolent than arch globalizers Nike and Adidas.

    The wider moral high ground issue is interesting as it usually has something to do with which ever club is supposedly favoured by the establishment. Rangers are associated with the Crown’s hegemony over Scotland (and Northern Ireland) and are hence seen as the club of the occupying forces. Yet, had they been founded in the Middle Ages, they would perhaps have been viewed as representative of a “common man-friendly” pro-reform wing kicking against the corrupt abuses of the established Church!

  1. December 11, 2010

    […] Barcelona and the Sacrifice of Principles “One of the more singular quirks of some football rivalries is an appropriation of the moral high ground by one club over another. It can be seen in some ways in the rivalry between Celtic and Rangers, where the perception from the outside has long been of a near-bunker mentality at Ibrox. A similar situation exists in Spain, where Barcelona have, in recent years, become a symbol of something other than just football. FC Barcelona was in itself, long ago, a political statement. Camp Nou was, in Franco’s Spain, the only place where Catalan nationalist feeling could be openly expressed and, although it is now more than three decades since the general’s death, a sense remains that Barcelona stands for something “other”, while Real Madrid are the club of the establishment.” twohundredpercent […]

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