What Not To Wear – 2008 Edition (Part Two)

Back in the day, of course, it didn’t really matter that much. Teams wore their shirts, and if they both wore identical colours, one of them would have to change into something different. At the 1978 World Cup, France and Hungary both turned up in their home shirts (red & blue respectively), and France were requested to change their shirts because the majority of TV sets in Argentina were black and white, and the watching audience would not be able to tell them apart. France ended up having to borrow a set of striped shirts from local side Club Kimberley de Mar Del Plata (who are still going, by the way), and turned out in those instead. Back home in England, they were a perfunctory affair – an afterthought in the burgeoning market of sportswear. They were almost always yellow. Things, however, have changed. The red shirts that England wore at the 2006 World Cup were, according to Umbro, the biggest selling football shirts of all time in the replica market. Nowadays, teams will turn in their away kits for absolutely no reason whatsoever (well, no reason above and beyond the importance of getting them into the public spotlight so that people will go out and buy them), but it’s still quite important that we know who is wearing what, not least because seven of the teams playing at...

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